Guided Trips

FISHING REPORT AND SYNOPSIS: 12/16/2018

The brown and brook trout are done spawning for the year but the next generation is currently in the form of eggs in the gravel. Please avoid wading through spawning areas. If you are unsure of what that looks like, Google "brown trout redd" or simply avoid walking through sand/gravel riffles and tailouts of pools. This can be a great time of year to fish in the Park. If you want solitude and a shot at a big brown trout, this is your best bet. If you want to learn about chasing this large post spawn fish, contact me for information on a guided fly fishing trip.

The tailwaters are all flowing high and keeping us mostly limited to streamers. With the continued wet weather, we probably will be limited to high water for the foreseeable future. Water temperatures here are coming down and Center Hill Lake surface temperatures are falling rapidly as well. Shad kills should be in our future for sometime this month and of course January and February and perhaps later into the spring. This fishing is very inconsistent day to day, but when you hit it right you might have the best fishing of your life.

Musky streams are up and down with the rains. We hope to get in a few musky floats soon. As always, check back here for updates as conditions change.

Photo of the Month: Fall on the Tellico

Photo of the Month: Fall on the Tellico

Saturday, April 14, 2007

Foul Weather, Epic Hatches, and Hungry Trout

The last two days have been less than desirable weather-wise. Of course, as a fly fisherman I start thinking about BWOs during inclement weather. The dreary conditions got the bugs going and the fish have responded enthusiastically (see video above). The surface of the water was carpeted at times with the little mayflies. Today, the hatch started in earnest while it was raining and this made it even harder for the bugs to take flight. The fish were feeding with abandon, completely oblivious to any potential dangers around them.

Yesterday was the better day as far as numbers of fish caught, but both days will be remembered for a long time to come. This was by far the largest and most concentrated hatch I've witnessed here in Tennessee. At times, I felt like I had been magically taken to the Firehole in Yellowstone where I have experienced similar blizzard hatches.
These bugs were everywhere and were being eaten by these...


The best two fish took my softhackle dropper instead of the dry fly offering...


The monotony of clouds and rain was broken when the sun made a late afternoon appearance, lighting up the opposite bank...




2 comments:

  1. Anonymous9:55 AM

    Howm many tails does that mayfly have? BWO only have two tail:)

    ReplyDelete
  2. Most of the bugs were not the Baetis that are more commonly known as BWOs but from what I can gather, they were most likely some species of Attenella. These bugs do have three tails and are also commonly referred to as small BWOs (or Slate-Wing Olives). I'm not enough of an entomologist to be sure about this so any further ideas would be welcome...

    ReplyDelete

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