Guided Trips

FISHING REPORT AND SYNOPSIS: 01/17/2019

Colder weather lately has slowed things down a touch in the Smokies. Thankfully, however, the streams haven't really dropped below 40 degrees so there are always some fish to be found. With a big rain event forecast for this weekend followed by sharply colder temperatures, get out and fish sooner rather than later. Nymphs or streamers are the name of the game this time of year.

On the tailwaters, we are dealing with massive amounts of water That said, while lots of rain this weekend may set us further back, there is a glimmer of hope on the horizon. The overall trend over the next 1-3 months is for drier conditions which should allow flows to stabilize and at least allow us to get some float trips in.

Musky fishing has been decent as of late. Flows are generally just about perfect on our favorite musky rivers. With cold weather ahead, this is something we'll probably be doing more of...

Photo of the Month: Cold Weather Jaws

Photo of the Month: Cold Weather Jaws

Tuesday, August 21, 2007

Home Water


After a long fishing trip, it would be easy to have one of two problems. The first problem that could develop would be an addiction to fishing every day as much as you wanted. The second potential problem is that you could get so tired of fishing that you wouldn't go for a few weeks.

I probably am as close to being right between these two problems (and hopefully this means normal) as you can get. The shakes haven't taken over yet but I don't have to stay away from fishing either. Curiosity took over yesterday and I made the short drive down to my "home" tailwater, the Caney Fork. I had to do some research to see how the fish were doing.

Wow! Talk about being a bit rusty. As much as it sounds ridiculous, the west had spoiled me with hard to spook, easy to catch fish. I started out using standard indicators and quickly had to go back to my dry dropper to get into fish. Once I started the old routine I remembered so well, things started to improve. Another problem soon became apparent however. Caney Fork fish are perhaps some of the fastest in the world at taking a fly and spitting it back out. I had grown accustomed to big stupid Cutts on the Yellowstone that would grab my fly and dart upstream with the indicator dragging behind. Reaction time wasn't all that important and so my reflexes were a bit off.


I stuck some nice fish and missed a bunch, but somehow managed to bring a few to hand as well. The good news I discovered is that the fish are in great shape heading towards fall. If we can avoid any late summer dissolved oxygen issues, this fall should bring some of the best fishing we've seen in awhile on the Caney Fork including some excellent sight fishing opportunities for larger fish. There are lots of healthy holdovers and all the fish seemed fat and full of fight. Of course, I can't make too many judgements off of just one fishing trip so expect to see me on the river again soon doing more "research."

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