Guided Trips

FISHING REPORT AND SYNOPSIS: 11/7/2019

Fall fishing is in full swing. The Clinch River has been fishing great if you want to hit a tailwater. The Smokies are fishing well most days but that could change soon. Forecast low temperatures by the middle of next week are in the mid teens!

The Smokies are up and down based on rain and cold fronts. When its on this can be some of the best fishing of the year. Fish will feed heavily as we approach the lean cold months of winter. Orange Elk Hair Caddis are catching fish as well as Pheasant Tail nymphs, Prince Nymphs, and some other things like caddis pupa patterns. Don't forget to have your Blue-winged Olive patterns this time of year.

On tailwaters like the Clinch, brown trout and some fall spawn rainbows are doing their thing. This is a good time to review good ethics when it comes to spawning trout. Remember that these are the next generation of trout and the best thing you can do is to leave them alone. Avoid wading through spawning areas and don't fish for obvious spawners.

The Caney is still not fishing well. This should change soon as we generally start to see some opportunity for streamer fishing in December and continuing through the winter. Next spring should bring good fishing again.

Photo of the Month: Fiery Flanks and Fins

Photo of the Month: Fiery Flanks and Fins

Saturday, July 09, 2011

Back In Felt

I first heard about the change announced by Simms over on Tom Chandler's Trout Underground and have since done some research although specific information is a little hard to come by.  In talking with Byron Begley at Little River Outfitters, it seems that, at least at my local shop, the staff and owners didn't bother complaining to Simms.  The customers that wanted felt simply bought other products while a good number of people opted to give rubber soles a try, and everyone was still satisfied.  On the other hand, at least one customer reported falling multiple times in his newly purchased rubber soled boots.  While my first instinct is to laugh at Simms for such a quick about-face, at the same time I have to respect them for actually listening to the consumer.

My initial reaction to the announcement of the ban was to fire off an email to Simms explaining how crucial felt was here in East Tennessee.  Of course it depends on your fishing and wading style, but for those that fish the Smokies and tailwaters with lots of slick ledges like the Hiwassee, felt is hands down the safest way to stay on your feet.  My most recent pair of wading boots was a pair of Redington boots I got a good deal on.  The main reason they weren't Simms was because I couldn't find any Simms felt sole boots anymore.  I'll be going back to Simms next year or whenever I need to buy a new pair of boots because they fit me better than any other boot I've tried yet, and I'll support a company that is so willing to listen to what their customers want...

When it comes to preventing invasive species, I believe that education is the answer.  Legislating or marketing a specific method or product will not work if the masses don't buy in.  Instead of trying to force the industry in the direction of their choosing, Simms would do well to put their time and dollars into spearheading a collective effort to provide education to anglers and perhaps researching the best methods to clean gear. 

In talking to the good people at Little River Outfitters, I was alerted to another method to clean gear that is used by the Great Smoky Mountains NP fisheries biologists.  I have a few documents, brochures and papers to peruse but will be sharing more on that in a few days...

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