Guided Trips

FISHING REPORT AND SYNOPSIS: 10/17/2018

Fishing continues to be good to excellent in the Great Smoky Mountains of east Tennessee. Delayed harvest streams are also being stocked and fishing well in east Tennessee and western North Carolina.

In the Smokies, fall bugs are in full swing. We have been seeing blue-winged olives almost daily although they will hatch best on foul weather days. They are small, typically running anywhere from #20-#24 although a few larger ones have also shown up. A few Yellow Quills are still hanging on in the mid to high elevation brook trout water although not for long. October caddis (more properly, great autumn sedges) are hatching in good numbers now on the North Carolina side of the Park and just starting on the Tennessee side. Terrestrials still have a place in your fly box as well although they are definitely winding down for the year. Isonychia nymphs, caddis pupa, and BWO nymphs will get it done for your subsurface fishing. Have some October Caddis (#12) and parachute BWO patterns (#18-#22) for dry flies and you should be set. Brook trout are still eating smaller yellow dry flies as well. Not interested in matching the hatch? Then fish a Pheasant Tail nymph under a #14 Parachute Adams. That rig can catch fish year round in the Smokies.

Brook and brown trout are now moving into the open to spawn. During this time of year, please be extremely cautious about wading through gravel riffles and the tailouts of pools. If you step on the redd (nest), you will crush the eggs that comprise the next generation of fish. Please avoid fishing to actively spawning fish and let them do their thing in peace.

Our tailwaters are still cranking although the Caney is finally starting to come down. I'm hoping to get some type of a report for there soon. Stay tuned for more on that. Fishing will still be slow overall with limited numbers of fish in that particular river unfortunately.

The Clinch is featuring high water as they try to catch up on the fall draw down. All of the recent rainfall set them back in this process but flows are now going up to try and make up some of the time lost. It is still fishing reasonably well on high water although we are holding off for the low water of late fall and early winter as it is one of our favorite times to be on the river.

Smallmouth are about done for the year with the cooler weather we are now experiencing. Our thoughts will be turning to musky soon, however. Once we are done with guide trips for the year, we'll be spending more time chasing these monsters.

In the meantime, we still have a few open dates in November and one or two in October. Feel free to get in touch with me if you are interested in a guided trip. Thanks!

Photo of the Month: Fishing in Paradise

Photo of the Month: Fishing in Paradise

Tuesday, January 24, 2012

Sunsets

Where I live, I am blessed to have good views nearly to the horizon in all directions provided I walk a couple of hundred feet up the road.  More often than not, you will find me wandering up the road in the evening for a short walk as a way to relax at the end of the day.  Of course, if I lived on the bank of a great trout stream I would probably be knee deep in the water, but life should be taken as it comes.  Thus, for the time being, I'll be content with my evening stroll.  The most consistent draw on these walks is watching the sunset.  If I could drag myself out of bed consistently early each morning I would watch the sun rise as well, but so far I only catch that phenomenon every now and then. 

The vast horizon tends to offer up some pretty special sunsets although sometimes they sneak up on me when I least expect it.  Yesterday was such a day.  As I headed up the road from my house, I had my camera dangling around my neck, hopeful for a nice end to the day but not really expecting much.  In fact, the sky seemed to be indicating that the day would end with high clouds streaming overhead, giving the day a gray finish.  When I made it about 100 feet from my house, this is all I saw...


By the time I made it 200 feet, there were vague indications of the treat ahead although I was still somewhat pessimistic about my chances of a light show.

 
A quarter of a mile down the road, a glow started spreading from low in the western sky.  A beautiful end to a nice day, but nothing spectacular.  I was happily snapping a couple of pictures before resuming my walk.


After three pictures, what I saw made me run up the road to a better vantage point.  The following 20 or so minutes were one of great examples of why you should always carry a camera.  I couldn't take enough pictures although in situations like this the pictures never seem good enough.  In my mind I have a memory, and in pictures I still have at least an impression of how beautiful the sky was.  For several minutes, a brilliant sun pillar was standing in the western sky.  The whole experience just reminded me how fortunate I am to live in a place where I can see the sunset and especially have the time to do it.

 








2 comments:

  1. Wow, that was awesome. You don't see them like that very often.

    Mark

    ReplyDelete
  2. That sunset is beautiful. It reminds me of when I was on this trip with http://www.jackhumeadventures.com. We caught so many trout and just sat back and enjoyed the scenery.

    ReplyDelete

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