Guided Trips

FISHING REPORT AND SYNOPSIS: 6/19/2017

Fishing is good to excellent across the area. The Caney Fork River continues to shine on both high and low water. In the Smokies, frequent rainfall have kept water in the streams so the fish are healthy and ready to eat!

Terrestrials are really coming on strong now. Ants and inchworms continue to get it done, and beetle fishing should be rapidly improving over the next two weeks. Isonychia mayfly nymphs are providing good fishing subsurface along with Golden and Little Yellow Stonefly nymphs. There is still a good variety of mayflies hatching in the higher elevations. Brook trout fishing is about as good as it gets now for those willing to walk. Even fishing roadside is good for now and will continue that way as long as we keep getting rain.

The Caney Fork River continues to fish anywhere from average to good on high water streamer floats. Anyone who wants to target trout with streamers will find this to be exciting fishing. Low water is becoming more and more likely, and if that trend continues we will see some great low water floats. The fish are hungry and we are going into some of the best fishing months on this fine tailwater. Midge hatches have been incredible on low or falling water and the fish are feeding. We have the right flies to catch the fish so book a guided trip now!

Cumberland Plateau smallmouth streams are rounding into fine shape now. Rain will bump flows up again, but in between the fish are hungry and willing to hammer a fly!


Photo of the Month: Shad Eating Rainbow

Photo of the Month: Shad Eating Rainbow

Sunday, November 11, 2012

Late Season Opportunities

While winter is rapidly approaching, the weather is still bi-polar.  The cold season has not yet arrived in force, meaning that one weekend is perfect with highs in the 60s on the plains and 50s in the mountains and the next weekend it snows with frigid overnight lows.  Last weekend was one of the good weekends, at least if you're an angler.  I made it to the mountains to a favorite stream to chase the browns.


Watching a fish get fired up over a streamer is one of my favorite aspects of the sport.  Accordingly, I headed to a stretch where I could toss some streamers and see what would happen.  In the first pool, I watched a fish shoot out of the back of the deepest part to attack my streamer.  Somehow it couldn't find the hook though.  Several casts later, with the fish repeating its behavior, I finally just gave up and moved to a different spot.  Sometimes fish just want to chase but not eat.

Over the next couple of hours, I covered a ton of water.  Several nice fish were out and about and a few smaller ones were even on redds.  The largest fish I saw made me gasp in amazement at how a fish of well over 20 inches could live in such small water.  In another spot, I watched a pod of big runner browns swimming in circles in a big pool, just waiting for the right moment to move up and spawn.

The fish that I hooked all wanted to attack whichever streamer I happened to have on at the moment.  Others had the same idea, but streamer fishing is not usually a high percentage game.  I generally expect a lot of follows, refusals, and the usual swing and a miss.  Enough fish found the hook though to keep me interested.


Later in the day, I moved on to a more sheltered stretch of stream and hoped for some blue-winged olives.  The hatch didn't develop, or perhaps I was too late.  A few stray midges were coming off, and I did trick one small brown on a midge, but that was it.  The consolation was a great sunset and beautiful reflected light on the stream.  I spent more time behind my camera lens than fishing during the late day hours...



9 comments:

  1. This may be a very dumb question, but I don't live near a trout stream and only get the opportunity to fish them every couple of months or so. But how do you know if a trout is on the red? Will they build a nest out of gravel?

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    1. Atlas, you are correct, they build a next out of gravel. Generally you will find them in the tail of pools and riffles where the smaller gravel is. The female will dig out a hollow in the gravel which is a fairly obvious depression in the streambed. You can find areas the fish have been spawning or preparing nests because the gravel is a lot cleaner there compared to everywhere else usually. Somewhere I have some pictures of fish on or close to redds. If I can find them I'll try to put a post together about it...

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    2. Thank you for the information and your response. I would greatly appreciate that.

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  2. Hi David. I nudged Howard to take you along when he fishes Boulder Creek with the creel attached. Looking forward to the video if caves and takes you.

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    Replies
    1. Mark, it should be a pretty good adventure and probably an even better video... :D

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  3. the pictures here look so cool.

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  4. I'll be up for it as soon as I can pull myself out of my rocker. I'm looking forward to meeting David. I think I can teach him a bit...about photography,(not!) fishing, (not!!) or women, (definitely not!!!) Oh well, I'll buy the beers.

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    Replies
    1. We'll definitely have a good time fishing together sometime. Now if next spring can just hurry up...

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