Guided Trips

FISHING REPORT AND SYNOPSIS: 8/13/2017

Fishing is good to excellent across the area. Caney Fork floats are happening either early or late, and in the Smokies we are fishing the high elevations to beat the heat.

Terrestrials are now a strong producer no matter where you fish. Beetle fishing has been good this summer. There are still fish ready to slam a beetle or hopper. In the mountains I prefer a beetle or ant while on the tailwaters I lean towards a hopper or beetle although ants work well there also. Hike in fishing on the brook trout streams is still good right now although flows are low enough that you need to focus on stealth.

On the Caney Fork, the great sight fishing opportunities of summer are in full gear. Daily midge fishing to big trout is a possibility. Night times can produce some exciting fishing on streamers or even mouse patterns. Just be careful out there when its dark. The river is unforgiving even in the daylight.

Smallmouth bass fishing has been good to great. Fish are looking up as usual for this time of year. When they don't want to hit flies on top, crawdad or baitfish patterns will work.

Photo of the Month: Night Time Hog

Photo of the Month: Night Time Hog

Tuesday, October 29, 2013

Persistence

Have you ever gone fishing when you just weren't really feeling it?  After spotting and successfully stalking the nice brown trout,  I began to think that my day had reached its climax early.  My plan had been to head to a nearby river where I have hooked large fish before.  In fact, the fish in this particular spot have taken me to school.  The largest rainbow I've ever hooked was on this river.  The fish threw the fly after peeling line in one continuous blistering run downstream until I was well into the backing.  Those moments happen but rarely, at least when I'm trout fishing.

This was supposed to be one of those redemption trips where you find and hook a nice fish and then don't lose it in the process of fighting it.  I just wasn't feeling it though.  Rigging up with a deep nymph system complete with midges and my favorite sow bug pattern brought a little confidence, but then the long times between even the most subtle of takes had me thinking increasingly about heading home.  Knowing that the fish were there was kind of nice but not hooking them was not helping with the feeling that the day was winding down.

Finally it was decision time.  I'll just head on out.  Then I noticed that the water had dropped a few inches and decided to try another few casts.  You know, just one more.  Of course, one became three, then four, and on cast four the indicator shot under.  Forget those gentle takes, this was undoubtedly a fish.  Pulling back, I realized that it was not just any fish but a decent trout, hopefully a brown.  The golden flash moments later verified that last bit.  The fish had succumbed to the sow bug pattern.


Yes, I was happy now.  My persistence had paid off.  Again I contemplated leaving, but again I decided on a few more casts.  Catching fish has a way of getting your mind back in the game.  The next time the indicator shot under, the ponderous head shakes that followed suggested a larger specimen.  The steady bulldogging convinced me that it was a brown.  Up and down the river I followed as the fish pretty much went wherever it wanted.  Slowly I gained line until finally I slipped the net under a beautiful male brown colored up like fall.


Likely the prettiest fish I'll catch this year, I took a moment to appreciate the reward I gained for my persistence.  Gently holding the fish in calm water, I gave the big brown the opportunity to rest from its exertions.  Only a moment was required before it shot back out into the current, but not without leaving behind a memory of the reward gained for persistence.

16 comments:

  1. Dude! Seriously nice fish. What a beauty. Congrats.

    Ben

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    1. Thanks Ben. I was definitely thrilled!

      David Knapp

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  2. Another great example of when persistence paid off! Hey, David, sometimes we have to wait until the fish "Feels it".

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    1. Mel, you're right. Sometimes I wonder how many fish I miss out on because I'm not patient enough.

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  3. Nice going David, beautiful fish. I think you've found an important key. Persistence does pay off.

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    1. Thanks Howard. Trips like this make the wait worth the while...

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  4. David
    It just doesn’t get any better than that awesome looking brown; beautiful colors. What was the length of this beast? Were you using your 5 or 6 wt to land him? I really enjoyed this read, thanks for sharing

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    1. Bill, the fish was right around 22". I was using my 5 weight and really thought I was going to lose him until he was actually in the net...

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  5. Beautiful

    Troutyeah.blogspot.com

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  6. Very nice! Great story.

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    1. Thanks Juan. We need to get together again sometime! I'll probably be heading down that way to fish in Pueblo as the weather cools. Let me know if you want to get out sometime.

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  7. Nice brown! It is always the one more cast....Great post!

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    1. So true! The one more cast has been working for me since I was a little kid...

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  8. Wow David, great story and stunning brown! I'm equally impressed by your ability to get high quality timed photos of yourself with the fish, nicely done. And I can relate to your post, sometimes you can go fishing without completely "feeling it", but a brown like that has a way of changing perspectives...

    Iain

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    1. Thanks Iain. I've had some experience with the timed photos and have come up with a few things to help, probably the most important is my BIG ghost net. I hate keeping fish out of the water so the big net helps keep them calm and most important, wet...

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