Guided Trips

FISHING REPORT AND SYNOPSIS: 5/22/2017

Fishing is good to excellent across the area. The Caney Fork River continues to shine on both high and low water. In the Smokies, strong hatches have been keeping fish looking up.

Yesterday, Blue-winged Olives hatched for hours during the light rain and drizzle. Fish were looking up but also took nymphs well. Streamers were moving some quality fish as well. The summer hatches are well under way now. Expect Golden and Little Yellow stoneflies and Isonychia (Slate Drake) mayflies. Light Cahills and Sulfurs have been around as well.

The Caney Fork River continues to fish anywhere from good to great on high water streamer floats. Anyone who wants to target trout with streamers will find this to be exciting fishing. Low water is becoming more and more likely, and if that trend continues we will see some great low water floats. The fish are hungry and we are going into some of the best fishing months on this fine tailwater.

Cumberland Plateau smallmouth streams are rounding into fine shape now. Rain will bump flows up again, but in between the fish are hungry and willing to hammer a fly! Musky floats are about over for the year unless we get more rain.


Photo of the Month: Shad Eating Rainbow

Photo of the Month: Shad Eating Rainbow

Tuesday, March 25, 2014

Perched on the Edge

Today is a great day to sit inside and read, tie flies, and look at old pictures.  I woke up to see snow coming down outside.  Not enough to stick thankfully, but there are still more than a few snowflakes floating around out there.

This morning I'm thinking of the beautiful weekend we had.  On Saturday I got out and hiked in the afternoon, and on Sunday I floated the Caney Fork with David Perry of Southeastern Fly.  More to come on that trip in the near future.

On my hike, I saw something that is actually pretty routine, but it never ceases to amaze me.  How in the world do plants grow in the little tiny cracks in rocks where you often find them?  This shot is looking straight down into a beautiful pool.  The rock is nearly vertical, and in the tiny crack on the rock face was not just one but two or three rhododendron plants.  How do the seeds even find their way perfectly into that spot to begin with?  I guess it is just another example of the beauty, wonder, and mystery of nature.


6 comments:

  1. Nature is a wonderful thing that makes the mind wander. If you find the answer to your questions, Dave, let us all know.

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    Replies
    1. Mel, it looks like Howard came along just in time to help me figure this out!

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  2. Those little roots can dig in anywhere.

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    Replies
    1. Isn't that the truth. It always amazes me for sure...

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  3. Luckily I came along just in time to answer your question. There is a tiny little guy with a teeny pot full of dirt living in that crack. He's really got a green thumb doesn't he?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Howard! I've been trying to figure this one out for awhile. I think I can quit wondering and actually get some sleep tonight!

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