Guided Trips

UPDATE: 5/1/2016 Smokies Fly Fishing Report -- Current Hatches: Blue-winged Olives, Little Black Caddis, Brown stoneflies, Hendricksons, March Browns, Sulfurs, Light Cahills, Pale Evening Duns, Little Yellow Stoneflies, Tan Caddis, inch worms, and ants. Fishing is very good now in the Smokies. Hatches are quite diverse depending on which streams you are fishing and what elevation you are at. It is still early spring up on the high brook trout streams but almost summer down low. Both dry flies and nymphs are catching a lot of fish now. If you need to learn how to fish these streams, a guided trip with me can help you accomplish that!

Caney Fork Fly Fishing Report: The Caney Fork is fishing well now. Flows are great for both float or wade trips. Contact me about a float or wade trip if you want to enjoy this fishing at TroutZoneAnglers@gmail.com or call/text (931) 261-1884.

Clinch River Fishing Report: Fishing is anywhere from good to slow depending on the day and your casting ability. Long casts, long drifts, small flies. Sulfurs are starting now and the fish are noticing. When there aren't a lot of bugs on the water, stick with small nymphs and midge patterns and you should catch some nice trout.

Cumberland Plateau Fishing Report: Flows are good and water temperatures are warming. Smallmouth are coming on strong now and wade fishing the creeks and streams for smallmouth and various sunfish will only get better from here on out.

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Photo of the Month: High Sticking Smoky Mountain Style

Photo of the Month: High Sticking Smoky Mountain Style

Tuesday, August 19, 2014

Flopping Fish

Over the years, I've had so many people make observations about the fish pictures I take.  "How do you get the fish to hold still?" is one of the most common questions I hear.  Generally, you have to have the camera ready very quickly after lifting the fish out of the water.  Have your buddy compose the shot first and take the picture as soon as the fish is in place (there's a reason a lot of the best pictures have water dripping off the fish).  Snap 2-3 very quickly and one will usually turn out.  Then get that fish back in the water ASAP.  Done correctly, a fish should never be out of the water more than 10 seconds and even that is on the long side.  Ideally this is done with two people of course.  If you have to take self timer shots, get a BIG net and keep that fish in the water until the last possible moment.  The last thing you want to do is kill a fish that you intend to release.

And now for the whole point of this post, I wanted to make sure you all realize that not all fish are cooperative, I thought I would share a favorite brookie shot I just came across from a couple of years ago.  Actually, I have a whole collection of these "action" shots. Maybe I'll do an expanded post showing them another time and you can all laugh at my (and other anglers') facial expressions as I realize the fish is headed somewhere else.  For now, here is one of many anti-picture brook trout.  At least the colors are still beautiful!


6 comments:

  1. Smile! You're on Candid Camera!

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    Replies
    1. Howard, if only I had some of these on video...

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  2. David
    Exactly why I didn't handle the brown trout I landed with David on the Caney the other day, for some reason trout never hold still long enough for me to take a decent picture. When I am fishing by myself I usually work the trout to the waters edge and take the photo and then release it there. Thanks for sharing

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Bill, the one good thing about guided trips with the guide and one other angler is that you can always have the guide hold the fish and your buddy can take the picture while you just pose with your nice catch. So I guess I'm saying, find a buddy to bring on the float so we can get some big fish pictures for you!

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  3. Sometimes those little guys just don't stay still.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mark, I'll have to dig out some shots of not so little guys too. Fish just don't like to hold still I think...

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