Guided Trips

UPDATE: 8/25/2016 Smokies Fly Fishing Report -- Current Hatches: Isonychias (Slate Drake), Little Yellow Stoneflies, Golden Stoneflies, Tan and Cinnamon Caddis, inch worms, beetles, and ants. Tough summer conditions prevail once again. Warm weather and low flows means two things: go up high in elevation and be ultra sneaky. Think terrestrials for the most part but don't hesitate to experiment a little. If you need to learn how to fish these streams and where to go, a guided trip with me can help you accomplish that!

Caney Fork Fly Fishing Report: This river continues to shine. This is one of the better summers I've had the privilege to enjoy on this river and things should continue to be good as we head into the fall. Boat traffic is starting to slow down a little on weekdays so this is a good time to get out. Midges are the primary producer on our float trips now. I have some availability if you are looking for a guided trip so contact me about a float or wade trip if you want to enjoy this fishing at TroutZoneAnglers@gmail.com or call/text (931) 261-1884.

Clinch River Fishing Report: Flows are mostly up so heavy deep nymphing or streamer fishing will be the way to go during periods of generation. Look for fish eating terrestrials along the banks and especially in areas of soft water.

Holston River: Give this river a break on the trout sections until next winter. Water temperatures on most of the trout water are elevated and fishing now will stress these beautiful fish.

Cumberland Plateau Fishing Report: Smallmouth bass fishing is good as of late. Both topwater bugs and subsurface offerings are getting it done. Before we know it, the cooler weather of fall will have us chasing muskie again as well!


Photo of the Month: Catch and Release

Photo of the Month: Catch and Release

Tuesday, August 19, 2014

Flopping Fish

Over the years, I've had so many people make observations about the fish pictures I take.  "How do you get the fish to hold still?" is one of the most common questions I hear.  Generally, you have to have the camera ready very quickly after lifting the fish out of the water.  Have your buddy compose the shot first and take the picture as soon as the fish is in place (there's a reason a lot of the best pictures have water dripping off the fish).  Snap 2-3 very quickly and one will usually turn out.  Then get that fish back in the water ASAP.  Done correctly, a fish should never be out of the water more than 10 seconds and even that is on the long side.  Ideally this is done with two people of course.  If you have to take self timer shots, get a BIG net and keep that fish in the water until the last possible moment.  The last thing you want to do is kill a fish that you intend to release.

And now for the whole point of this post, I wanted to make sure you all realize that not all fish are cooperative, I thought I would share a favorite brookie shot I just came across from a couple of years ago.  Actually, I have a whole collection of these "action" shots. Maybe I'll do an expanded post showing them another time and you can all laugh at my (and other anglers') facial expressions as I realize the fish is headed somewhere else.  For now, here is one of many anti-picture brook trout.  At least the colors are still beautiful!


6 comments:

  1. Smile! You're on Candid Camera!

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    Replies
    1. Howard, if only I had some of these on video...

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  2. David
    Exactly why I didn't handle the brown trout I landed with David on the Caney the other day, for some reason trout never hold still long enough for me to take a decent picture. When I am fishing by myself I usually work the trout to the waters edge and take the photo and then release it there. Thanks for sharing

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    Replies
    1. Bill, the one good thing about guided trips with the guide and one other angler is that you can always have the guide hold the fish and your buddy can take the picture while you just pose with your nice catch. So I guess I'm saying, find a buddy to bring on the float so we can get some big fish pictures for you!

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  3. Sometimes those little guys just don't stay still.

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    Replies
    1. Mark, I'll have to dig out some shots of not so little guys too. Fish just don't like to hold still I think...

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