Guided Trips

FISHING REPORT AND SYNOPSIS: 06/01/2018

Heavy rains the last couple of days means we will see high water on the tailwaters for the next week or two. Fishing in the Smokies is good to excellent though. That trend will continue as long as we keep getting rain. Brook trout fishing has been quite exceptional so far this year. Lower to mid elevation streams are still fishing well because of the increased flows due to the rainfall. Smallmouth bass streams on the Cumberland Plateau are a bit high but should be fishable again in the next few days.

Photo of the Month: Clinch River Memory

Photo of the Month: Clinch River Memory

Wednesday, November 12, 2014

Big Creek

While I generally feel like I know the Smokies pretty well, there are still several places in the Park I haven't fished.  Okay, there are a lot of places I haven't fished.  After all, with hundreds of miles of fishable water, the problem is one of time and accessibility.  The more accessible water is what I normally fish because I am usually low on time.  One place that takes a bit of effort to get to is Big Creek.


I chose the "miles of gravel road" route for my recent exploration.  Having only passed that entrance of the Smokies once before, I was in for a treat.  The stream reminded me a lot of other Smokies streams like the Middle Prong of Little River or perhaps even Little River proper above Elkmont, but what a wonderful little stream!  No, I didn't catch any monsters or for that matter even all that many fish, but fishing a new stream is always a great experience.  Each pocket, pool, and run provides the little surprises that always come with discovery.


One large pool had a deep section off to the side with a gentle current running through.  The surprising lack of conflicting currents meant that the cast was actually pretty straight forward.  The trout were obviously holding just under the surface and were rising consistently.  My third cast resulted in a fish.  In another pool, I surprised myself by setting the hook.  The dry had slowly sunk and I'm still not sure if I actually saw the fish or perhaps subconsciously my brain registered the swirl that was the fish taking right in the heavy current.  Either way, when I set the hook the fish was as surprised as I was.  Of course, these little surprises happen on my home waters as well, but there it lacks that new feeling.


Most surprising of all perhaps were the large pools.  Having never been there but always hoping to see it, I climbed out of the gorge right where the stream tumbles out, climbing straight up the side of what felt an awful lot like a cliff, and hit the trail upstream to the Midnight Hole.  It was as beautiful as the pictures I had seen and even larger than I realized.  My last fishing memory for the day was made on this pool.


Trout are everywhere in that pool, but were relatively tough to fool.  It wasn't until I noticed some rises against the far bank that things began to work out.  Checking for trees behind me, I was soon casting the big orange Elk Hair Caddis to the boulders across from me.  A nice trout ate and I managed to keep it on throughout the fight.


As much as I enjoyed fishing at Big Creek, I was actually on my way over to Cataloochee for 2 nights of camping and with luck would make it over there before dark to fish a little more.  Soon I was hustling back down the trail, but already knew that I would be back again, even if it is a little out of the way.




4 comments:

  1. Beautiful pictures ! Nice to see some trees with leaves on them

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    Replies
    1. Mark, it was a great fall down here but as usual it didn't last long enough.

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  2. I love that "miles of gravel road" route. Many of the places I fish out here are on "miles of gravel road". That's why Chevrolet made 4x4's. Nice color on those Rainbows.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks Mark! There is something about traveling a ways on gravel that just makes you feel like you are alone. Good stuff for sure!

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