Guided Trips

FISHING REPORT AND SYNOPSIS: 5/22/2017

Fishing is good to excellent across the area. The Caney Fork River continues to shine on both high and low water. In the Smokies, strong hatches have been keeping fish looking up.

Yesterday, Blue-winged Olives hatched for hours during the light rain and drizzle. Fish were looking up but also took nymphs well. Streamers were moving some quality fish as well. The summer hatches are well under way now. Expect Golden and Little Yellow stoneflies and Isonychia (Slate Drake) mayflies. Light Cahills and Sulfurs have been around as well.

The Caney Fork River continues to fish anywhere from good to great on high water streamer floats. Anyone who wants to target trout with streamers will find this to be exciting fishing. Low water is becoming more and more likely, and if that trend continues we will see some great low water floats. The fish are hungry and we are going into some of the best fishing months on this fine tailwater.

Cumberland Plateau smallmouth streams are rounding into fine shape now. Rain will bump flows up again, but in between the fish are hungry and willing to hammer a fly! Musky floats are about over for the year unless we get more rain.


Photo of the Month: Shad Eating Rainbow

Photo of the Month: Shad Eating Rainbow

Tuesday, March 29, 2016

The Hiwassee Is On Fire



February through early May is my favorite time to fish the Hiwassee. The sweet spot though is late March into early April when the Hendricksons and Blue-Olives are hatching as well as various caddis and stoneflies. The last time I hit it right was back during my college days. In other words, it has been a few years too long. That is mostly my fault though and one I full intended to rectify this past Sunday.

Easter turned out a little different than originally planned and with my schedule suddenly open, I decided to take advantage of the free time. By the middle of the day I was headed southeast. The hope of mayflies and rising trout had me excited like a kid on Christmas morning.

My original plan involved hiking in somewhere in the Big Bend area but when I got to the river, the crowds were more than manageable so I just fished close to the car. The bugs were there and the fish were seemingly starving. I'll spare all of the details and try to resist bragging but will say this: the fishing was phenomenal and I probably caught more fish in those five or six hours than I've ever caught on the Hiwassee, and I've had some great days. Here are a few sights and trout from my day.

Redbuds

Hiwassee Brown Trout

Hiwassee average rainbow trout

Rainbow trout on the Hiwassee with great colors

Nice rainbow trout from the Hiwassee

8 comments:

  1. David
    Colorful trout, how far is the Hiwassee from your home? Never fish it, is it similar to the Elk? Thanks for sharing

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Bill, it is about 1.5-2 hours depending on how fast I am driving. It is more like a very large mountain stream. By large, I mean it is one of Tennessee's largest trout tailwaters, but by mountain stream I mean it is very rocky with lots of bedrock ledges. This creates lots of little pools and runs plus some very large pools so it fishes a lot like a mountain stream on low water.

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  2. Love that set of transition photos.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks! This is a great time of year that produces a lot of those moments to enjoy.

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  3. All those trout...think my fire alarm just went off!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This is, in my opinion, the best time of year to wade fish the Hiwassee. If you ever get a chance to fish it then you'll see what I mean. Thanks for stopping by!

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    2. David were the Hendrickson hatching consistently yet? I'm going this weekend and wondering if I need to tie up some extras?

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    3. They were coming off pretty good and should be even better now. The dogwoods are in bloom so it is time...

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