Guided Trips

FISHING REPORT AND SYNOPSIS: 10/4/2018

Fishing continues to be good to excellent in the Great Smoky Mountains of east Tennessee. Delayed harvest streams are also being stocked and fishing well in east Tennessee and western North Carolina.

In the Smokies, fall bugs are in full swing. We have been seeing blue-winged olives almost daily although they will hatch best on foul weather days. They are small, typically running anywhere from #20-#24 although a few larger ones have also shown up. A few Yellow Quills are still hanging on in the mid to high elevation brook trout water although not for long. October caddis (more properly, great autumn sedges) are hatching in good numbers now on the North Carolina side of the Park and just starting on the Tennessee side. Terrestrials still have a place in your fly box as well although they are definitely winding down for the year. Isonychia nymphs, caddis pupa, and BWO nymphs will get it done for your subsurface fishing. Have some October Caddis (#12) and parachute BWO patterns (#18-#22) for dry flies and you should be set. Brook trout are still eating smaller yellow dry flies as well. Not interested in matching the hatch? Then fish a Pheasant Tail nymph under a #14 Parachute Adams. That rig can catch fish year round in the Smokies.

Our tailwaters are still cranking although the Caney is finally starting to come down. I'm hoping to get some type of a report for there soon. Stay tuned for more on that. Fishing will still be slow overall with limited numbers of fish in that particular river unfortunately.

The Clinch is featuring high water as they try to catch up on the fall draw down. All of the recent rainfall set them back in this process but flows are now going up to try and make up some of the time lost. It is still fishing reasonably well on high water although we are holding off for the low water of late fall and early winter as it is one of our favorite times to be on the river.

Smallmouth are about done for the year with the cooler weather we are now experiencing. Our thoughts will be turning to musky soon, however. Once we are done with guide trips for the year, we'll be spending more time chasing these monsters.

In the meantime, we still have a few open dates in November and one or two in October. Feel free to get in touch with me if you are interested in a guided trip. Thanks!

Photo of the Month: Fishing in Paradise

Photo of the Month: Fishing in Paradise

Tuesday, February 26, 2008

Too Cold

A front was pushing through the area today. This morning it actually felt quite warm out and I was hoping that it would turn out to be a nice day. By the middle of the afternoon, the front had passed and left us with a brisk northwest wind and mostly cloudy skies. I knew right away that no one else would be out fishing today so I headed over to my new fishin' hole to catch some more fish.

After an hour fishing, I'd had enough but not before catching two fish. The wind was a pain to cast in but even worse because it made it feel much colder than it really was. Earlier this winter I fished when it was in the 20's out and my guides were icing up. I actually felt warmer then than I did today. It was all the sweeter because I caught fish on a new pattern I dreamed up the other day. Basically it was a red tag off the back end, wrap orange egg yarn for the body, and then a sparse wing of brown over white bucktail. Of course, I also suspect that warmwater fish are a lot dumber than trout and will eat just about anything so it has yet to be seen if it is a good fish producer. Today could have been a coincidence.


Thankfully, I won't be heading back much more for a couple weeks. That's because I'll be out chasing TROUT which is really my favorite...ahhhhh, spring break!!!

2 comments:

  1. ijsouth9:21 PM

    Don't badmouth the warmwater fish too much - I cut my fishing teeth on bass fishing, and they can get plenty educated in a hurry, if the fishing pressure is high. Now, bream and whatnot can be pretty gullible, and when the conditions are right, so can a lot of the saltwater fish - speckled trout spend the whole summer spawning and eating shrimp, and if you hit them right, you can get a limit in a matter of minutes.

    But, I know what you mean about the trout streams - it's definitely special.

    ReplyDelete
  2. ijsouth, I got my start on bass and panfish myself. There still fun on occasion but honestly, I haven't fished warmwater at all the last few years, maybe once a year at most. My recent trips are mainly a product of a lack of time to drive farther and high gas prices. There's just something about trout though that I can't explain, although I'm sure you know what I mean. Trout streams are indeed special as you said...

    ReplyDelete

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