Guided Trips

FISHING REPORT AND SYNOPSIS: 10/17/2017

Fishing is excellent in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park now. We have had a couple of shots of rain the last week and a half which has helped keep the streams flowing strong for this time of year. The cool overnight temperatures will get the brown and brook trout seriously thinking about spawning. Please be careful this time of year and avoid walking on fine sand and gravel in riffles and tailouts. Leave the spawning trout alone so they can do their thing. When you find brook or brown trout that aren't spawning, they are aggressive and looking to feed. Recent guide trips on brook trout waters have been anywhere from good to excellent. Streams with rainbows and browns have been excellent as well. There are good numbers of fish to be caught in the Park right now!

A variety of bugs have been hatching lately. On cloudy days, Blue-winged Olives have hatched along with some other small mayflies. Various caddis, including the Great Autumn Brown Sedges (often referred to as October Caddis by locals) are hatching and provide a nice bite for the trout. Little Black stoneflies are hatching as well. Fish are eating both dry fly and nymph imitations and even still hitting some terrestrials. Don't forget your beetle, ant, and inchworm fly box. A Parachute Adams or Yellow or Orange Stimulator should work well for a dry fly. Smaller bead head Pheasant Tail nymphs should work as a dropper. Caddis pupa are also catching a lot of fish as are stonefly nymphs.

On the Caney Fork, things have been tough lately. The river has been running warmer than is normal this time of year because of heavy generation earlier this year and also with a stain due to the sluice gate operations. Work has been underway to install vented turbines on the generators and they have been working to try and tweak them to improve dissolved oxygen. One day, we were floating and they were checking the DO and found it at 1.5 ppm. If I remember correctly, the minimum target is 6 ppm. Obviously 1.5 is way too low. Trout were sitting along the banks and in back eddies gasping for oxygen. Hopefully all of this won't have too much of a long term effect on the fishery, but needless to say, things are a bit difficult as of right now. Cooler weather should help. Once the lake turns over, oxygen and clarity will improve quickly.

The Clinch River has been fishing well if you can hit it on low water days. Small nymphs and midges will get the job done here.

Smallmouth bass are about done for the year, but we will be back out on the musky streams again soon looking for the toothy critters. This is tough fishing, but the rewards can be sizable.

Photo of the Month: Night Time Hog

Photo of the Month: Night Time Hog

Thursday, May 14, 2009

Small Stream Poll

If you have not done so already, please vote in the poll (on the right side of the page) on your favorite water type in a small streams. Most small streams are largely pocket water with the occasional large pool to break the pattern. Pocket water is probably my favorite type of fishing, but pools provide special opportunities as well. Sometimes the difference between the two can be blurred. On really small streams, the pools may be the size of most small pockets on a larger river. Still, the pools generally require a more stealthy approach than the pocket water regardless of size. Normally my preference is pocket water, but some days I just want to fish pools and hustle past all the prime pockets in the stream...really, it is all fun...

So, which do you prefer?

5 comments:

  1. I never do well in the big glassy pools on the truckee-- it would require me to re-rig my heavily weighted nymph rig with a tiny leader and tiny dry flies with droppers.

    I love fishing the big fast pools though

    that picture with the bridge intimidates me-- I suck at casting dries especially when theres a lot of brush around

    ReplyDelete
  2. Hello,my name is Fernando from Spain. Your blog is very good, but sometimes I cannot understand with my poor English. Excuse me, but could you tell me what pocket water means?
    Thank you.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Fernando, pocket water is the faster water with large rocks breaking the flow. The pockets formed behind the rocks nearly always have a trout or two living in them. In the pictures above, the first picture is pocket water and the last picture is the bottom end of a calm pool...

    ReplyDelete
  4. you're poll's missing an option... runs

    I wouldn't fish that glassy pool either. but I'd rather fish a defined run leading into a pool than the pocket water.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Small streams...the runs are pocket water...generally that is... Good point though! With your dry fly skills you would kill 'em on that particular glassy pool. If you haven't fished there, we need to hit it up this fall...

    ReplyDelete

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