Guided Trips

FISHING REPORT AND SYNOPSIS: 10/4/2018

Fishing continues to be good to excellent in the Great Smoky Mountains of east Tennessee. Delayed harvest streams are also being stocked and fishing well in east Tennessee and western North Carolina.

In the Smokies, fall bugs are in full swing. We have been seeing blue-winged olives almost daily although they will hatch best on foul weather days. They are small, typically running anywhere from #20-#24 although a few larger ones have also shown up. A few Yellow Quills are still hanging on in the mid to high elevation brook trout water although not for long. October caddis (more properly, great autumn sedges) are hatching in good numbers now on the North Carolina side of the Park and just starting on the Tennessee side. Terrestrials still have a place in your fly box as well although they are definitely winding down for the year. Isonychia nymphs, caddis pupa, and BWO nymphs will get it done for your subsurface fishing. Have some October Caddis (#12) and parachute BWO patterns (#18-#22) for dry flies and you should be set. Brook trout are still eating smaller yellow dry flies as well. Not interested in matching the hatch? Then fish a Pheasant Tail nymph under a #14 Parachute Adams. That rig can catch fish year round in the Smokies.

Our tailwaters are still cranking although the Caney is finally starting to come down. I'm hoping to get some type of a report for there soon. Stay tuned for more on that. Fishing will still be slow overall with limited numbers of fish in that particular river unfortunately.

The Clinch is featuring high water as they try to catch up on the fall draw down. All of the recent rainfall set them back in this process but flows are now going up to try and make up some of the time lost. It is still fishing reasonably well on high water although we are holding off for the low water of late fall and early winter as it is one of our favorite times to be on the river.

Smallmouth are about done for the year with the cooler weather we are now experiencing. Our thoughts will be turning to musky soon, however. Once we are done with guide trips for the year, we'll be spending more time chasing these monsters.

In the meantime, we still have a few open dates in November and one or two in October. Feel free to get in touch with me if you are interested in a guided trip. Thanks!

Photo of the Month: Fishing in Paradise

Photo of the Month: Fishing in Paradise

Friday, January 29, 2010

Force Feeding


Sometimes you have to hit a fish in the nose to get it to eat....literally. A couple of weekends ago I was fishing in the Smokies with a couple of fishing buddies, Joe and Caleb. Joe was fishing a nice flat run while I spotted from on top of the bank. In the back, a brown aggressively chased his offering but wouldn't quite eat. After a couple of repeat performances, the fish finally saw him and moved into the middle of the stream where it sat motionless on the bottom.

Not wanting to bother with a fish that was only eleven or twelve inches, Joe worked on upstream. I continued to watch the fish. Finally it occurred to me that the fish would probably eat if I could just force feed it. I grabbed my fly rod which had a weighted wooly bugger and crept into position. The first several casts drifted close but there was little interest from the fish. Once it gave a half-hearted glance at the fly drifting by but that was it.

I couldn't shake the feeling that the fish would eat and decided to try and drift the fly directly into the fish. A couple of casts later, the fly was drifting perfectly and a well-timed mend set up the final drift. Suddenly the fly seemed to disappear into the fish, and I set the hook hard. I can't say that I actually saw the fish open its mouth, but I did notice the fly just seemed to vanish with the fish being the only likely culprit. After a brief but lively battle, I brought the fish to hand and Joe came back downstream to snap a couple of pictures for me. It definitely wasn't the largest fish I've ever landed but it was one of the more satisfying. I believe it was the first time I ever force fed a fish intentionally without having it ever move to take the fly...

6 comments:

  1. Anonymous10:28 AM

    Makes me think of the salmon swing where fish are snagged in the mouth. I've fished all over and I'm not sure anything tops the satisfaction of catching browns in the Park. Good work.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Ok, Mr. Knapp, So i was sitting here trying to figure out what the exact definition of an intelligent comment was. The definition of intelligence is the ability to acquire and apply knowledge. So I read your blog and came to the conclusion that you spend an excessive amount of time upended in a runnel with your fly fishing rod! And that you have a passion (if in case no one noticed) beyond the definition of passion for fish and fishing. So this is my intelligent denouement. Hope you enjoyed, and please come again when you can't stay so long! JK
    Elise

    ReplyDelete
  3. Elise, glad you had time to check out my blog. Hope you are having a good break!

    ReplyDelete
  4. David - Stumbled upon your blog and glad I did. Looks like you fish some beautiful water. I've "following" your blog and will add it to my blogroll. Feel free to do the same (although you don't have to). Look forward to reading about your future outings.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Reuben Hall11:00 AM

    Knapp, this is what I learned from this post.
    Fishing takes a lot of patience, the kind that I wish I had. Especially when it is necessary to creep up on a fish, and then with some potency stuff the fly into its mouth: Patience is a virtue. Now I understand that fishermen have a great deal of patience not only with fish but also with anything else that requires it!!
    And as for an intelligent elucidation, I hope this qualifies.
    Reuben

    ReplyDelete
  6. Troutrageous, thanks for checking out my blog and thanks for the link. I added one to your blog.

    Reuben, patience is definitely a virtue...in fishing as well as teaching...hahaha.

    ReplyDelete

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