Guided Trips

FISHING REPORT AND SYNOPSIS: 01/17/2019

Colder weather lately has slowed things down a touch in the Smokies. Thankfully, however, the streams haven't really dropped below 40 degrees so there are always some fish to be found. With a big rain event forecast for this weekend followed by sharply colder temperatures, get out and fish sooner rather than later. Nymphs or streamers are the name of the game this time of year.

On the tailwaters, we are dealing with massive amounts of water That said, while lots of rain this weekend may set us further back, there is a glimmer of hope on the horizon. The overall trend over the next 1-3 months is for drier conditions which should allow flows to stabilize and at least allow us to get some float trips in.

Musky fishing has been decent as of late. Flows are generally just about perfect on our favorite musky rivers. With cold weather ahead, this is something we'll probably be doing more of...

Photo of the Month: Cold Weather Jaws

Photo of the Month: Cold Weather Jaws

Saturday, September 18, 2010

First of Many: Caney


Last week, I had a streak of 5 days in a row with at least a little fishing.  That is better than I have had in quite awhile, and as we continue to move into fall I expect my opportunities to get out to continue improving.  While still only a shadow of its former self, the Caney Fork continues to produce good fishing for mostly stocker rainbows.  There are larger holdover fish to be had, but I've been having trouble keeping them on when hooked. 

The trip last week was interesting for a couple of reasons.  First, there were no releases from the dam that particular day so I was able to get a good look at the river during low flows.  Anytime you can see a river at its lowest point, take advantage of the situation.  Even if the fishing is not perfect, you will learn some valuable information about the stream bottom.  The second interesting thing about the trip was the apparently very recent stocking.  I found freshly stocked fish, some in huge pods, all over the river. 

If these fish can escape the stringers and grow awhile, we'll have some excellent fishing over the next couple of years.  They have not learned much about what they are supposed to eat yet.  In fact, a fly with a bit of drag seemed an incentive to strike instead of a deterrent.  I finished my day ripping a very small streamer with a trailing softhackle through a small hole and watching as these stockers fought over the opportunity to slam the flies. 

In between pestering the little rainbows, I managed to find a willing brown that posed long enough for a picture.  I'm always glad to catch the browns so this fish made the trip that much better...

3 comments:

  1. I'm jealous of all the time you got to go fishing!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Hi David. The hopes for better fish in the future is the same reason I release a lot of stockers. They tend to be a little stupid. OK, a lot of stupid.

    Mark

    ReplyDelete
  3. Blake, I got lucky last week. I've been way busy as of late and finally got to fish some to make up for lost time.

    Mark, I wish more people had that attitude. The rivers here in TN can grow some huge trout if the fish just have a couple of years in the system. Unfortunately, the vast majority leave the river almost as soon as they are put in. Guess that's the way it goes for stocked trout though...

    ReplyDelete

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