Guided Trips

FISHING REPORT AND SYNOPSIS: 05/08/2019

Fishing is good to excellent just about everywhere now. Lots of bugs are hatching including mayflies, caddis, and stoneflies. Little yellow stoneflies are hatching well now making a nymph imitation a good bet. Light Cahills, Sulfurs, Pale Evening Duns, March Browns, Blue-winged Olives, and others are on the water at times. Golden stones are now hatching well also. Try a #14 Yellow Stimulator and a #16 bead head Pheasant Tail and be ready to catch fish!

On the Clinch River, sulfurs have started and fish are responding to dry fly imitations. This is some of the most exciting and also the most challenging fishing of the whole year. Pinpoint accuracy at distance is needed, but the rewards can be large. Water is now mostly higher making float trips a requirement. If it will quit raining sometime soon, lower flows should return.

The Caney Fork is up and down each day. Right now it is mostly up and will stay that way as long as it keeps raining. Streamer fishing in particular was great on one generator. Moving forward, this river should continue to fish better and better for the next month or two.

Warm water streams are starting to turn on very well. Smallmouth bass are aggressive now. This is the spawning season for these fish, so please be careful where you wade and leave spawning fish alone.

Photo of the Month: Big Brown Trout on Deep Creek

Photo of the Month: Big Brown Trout on Deep Creek

Thursday, September 08, 2011

Brown Trout Mania

My favorite time of year is upon is, when the browns turn agressive and the temperatures start to turn chilly.  The next 4-5 months will bring some of my favorite fishing conditions of the year.  Cold weather will keep the crowds away, and I can roam my favorite waters in peace.  While most people spend the majority of the winter tying flies for spring and dreaming of hatches to come, I'm doing most of my dreaming and tying now and fishing when its colder. 

Lately I've been specializing in fall patterns, both for general trout fishing in the mountains and for chasing monster browns with larger than normal flies.  Today I tied my first articulated pattern and thoroughly enjoyed it.  The only problem with these articulated patterns is that the time required to tie them means that losing one will probably bring on a bout of depression....for a minute or two anyways.  Here is my first attempt at an articulated streamer, inspiration thanks to Kelly Galloup's SD...

4 comments:

  1. Nice looking fly you have there. I am hoping to get out and do some trout fishing in November myself.

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  2. I would have to agree about fall/winter being my favorite time for trout fishing in peace.
    I would think losing one of those streamers would bring on a bout of profanity and cursing.

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  3. David
    If I only had the patience to get that far along with a fly--I hope to get into the tying mode one day. By the way I was on the Caney Fork last weekend along with a mass of other individuals, and had no success. I saw lot of fish rising but no takes on anything. I did figure out they were taking the smallest of the midges on top, which I couldn't match--somewhat frustrating from the fishing point of view, but from the wildlife point of view, lots of deer and turkey.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Bill, those super picky risers seem to like tiny midge dry patterns, at least when I've fished that hatch. I tie little #22 and #24 parachute patterns that the fish seem to like. Cream with brown hackle has always been a good producer for me...

    ReplyDelete

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