Guided Trips

FISHING REPORT AND SYNOPSIS: 3/23/2017
The fishing has been great lately! This spring has been phenomenal in the Smokies. Long hatches have produced dry fly fishing lasting for hours every day. The Caney Fork has been producing some great fish on high water.

In the Great Smoky Mountains, the spring fishing has started early this year. Quill Gordon (#12-#14) and Blue Quill (#16-#18) mayflies are starting to transition into Hendricksons (#12-#14). On foul weather days, the Blue-winged Olives (#18-#22) have literally poured off of the river. The recent cooler weather actually enhanced the dry fly fishing. The bugs have been having a harder time getting off of the water, so despite the cool water temperature, fish have been rising lazily through an extended afternoon hatch. Little Black Caddis (#18-#20) have been hatching well along with some Early Brown Stoneflies (#12).

On the tailwaters, the fishing has been decent to good. The Clinch is fishing well along with the Holston. The Caney Fork continues to be my river of choice, however. Streamer trips continue to produce and we are doing some high water nymphing as well. This is as good a time as any to have a shot at large rainbow and brown trout on this tailwater!

I still have some open dates for guided trips in April and May, but the calendar is filling fast. I've been turning away trips because people wait too long to book. Don't make that mistake!

Photo of the Month: Spring Is For Dry Flies

Photo of the Month: Spring Is For Dry Flies

Saturday, January 14, 2012

Plenty of Water

The trout must be happy lately, and if not, I'm sure they will be all next summer.  That's because it has rained, and rained, and then rained some more.  All this cold water will translate into plenty of cool water for the tailwaters in another 6-8 months or at least we hope.  Of course there are a lot of factors that come into play but right now things are looking good.  Unfortunately the fishing will continue to be difficult on the tailwaters for the next couple of weeks at least and probably longer for the wade fisherman.

I spent a few days at Fall Creek Falls this week and was able to enjoy the highest falls east of the Mississippi (coming in at a little over 250 feet) under much higher flows than usual.  The spitting rain and fog made things difficult with the camera meaning I didn't shoot for very long.  A few shots are always better than none however and I was reasonably happy with the result. 


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