Guided Trips

FISHING REPORT AND SYNOPSIS: 11/7/2019

Fall fishing is in full swing. The Clinch River has been fishing great if you want to hit a tailwater. The Smokies are fishing well most days but that could change soon. Forecast low temperatures by the middle of next week are in the mid teens!

The Smokies are up and down based on rain and cold fronts. When its on this can be some of the best fishing of the year. Fish will feed heavily as we approach the lean cold months of winter. Orange Elk Hair Caddis are catching fish as well as Pheasant Tail nymphs, Prince Nymphs, and some other things like caddis pupa patterns. Don't forget to have your Blue-winged Olive patterns this time of year.

On tailwaters like the Clinch, brown trout and some fall spawn rainbows are doing their thing. This is a good time to review good ethics when it comes to spawning trout. Remember that these are the next generation of trout and the best thing you can do is to leave them alone. Avoid wading through spawning areas and don't fish for obvious spawners.

The Caney is still not fishing well. This should change soon as we generally start to see some opportunity for streamer fishing in December and continuing through the winter. Next spring should bring good fishing again.

Photo of the Month: Fiery Flanks and Fins

Photo of the Month: Fiery Flanks and Fins

Thursday, June 21, 2012

Yellow Stones

Late spring and summer in the Smokies always means Little Yellow Stoneflies.  There are different species, ranging in size from the big Golden Stones down to #18 but most commonly in the #12-#16 range.  The following is one of my favorite patterns for this hatch.  I like it for two reasons:  it is easy to tie, and it floats very well.  If you want to try it out, here is the recipe.

Hook: #16 TMC 100 or similar dry fly hook
Thread: Yellow 8/0
Body:  Yellow Poly Yarn
Wing:  Yellow Poly Yarn
Hackle: Light or Medium Dun, trimmed on the bottom


Lots of other great patterns work, but I'm about efficient, easy to tie patterns that still wear out the fish.  Next time you are heading up to the Smokies, make sure and stay until evening and then tie one of these on.  You'll be glad you did...

6 comments:

  1. Nice and simple! And a floater for sure too.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Caleb, you're right, between the poly yarn and hackle it does great staying on top!

    ReplyDelete
  3. That fly would surely work in England when the Yellow Sallies are about. In flight they look like little yellowish Chinook helicopters and on the water they sit close like your cropped hackle lets your fly sit.

    Regular Rod

    ReplyDelete
  4. Regular Rod, I think getting the fly to sit on the water correctly is important and this fly almost always lands correctly and sits close to the surface. Definitely a good pattern!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Ever tie these in other colors as a simple fly pattern? i.e. grays or browns maybe?

    ReplyDelete
  6. I may have tied these in brown but I can't remember. It would be a great caddis pattern when tied in the correct hatch-matching colors. Definitely fun to experiment with. Another option is to dub the body but I really like the poly yarn wing as it floats well and is easy to see...

    ReplyDelete

Newsletter

Subscribe to the Trout Zone Anglers Newsletter!

* indicates required