Guided Trips

FISHING REPORT AND SYNOPSIS: 02/25/2018

Things have changed a lot since the last report. Unseasonably warm weather has kicked off the first hatches of the year in the Great Smoky Mountains while an extremely wet February means all of the tailwaters are blown out across middle and east Tennessee.

If you want to fish in the Smokies, nymphs and streamers will be your best bet unless you encounter a hatch. In that case, Blue Quills and Quill Gordons should be in your arsenal as well as Blue-winged Olives.

For now, just forget about the tailwaters in the short term. continued rain means it will be at least another month before the tailwaters are fishable again. With luck, we can start thinking about some streamer float trips on the Caney Fork in mid to late March, although that may be optimistic. In the meantime, head for the mountains and enjoy chasing the wild trout there.

Photo of the Month: Breaking Cabin Fever

Photo of the Month: Breaking Cabin Fever

Thursday, June 21, 2012

Yellow Stones

Late spring and summer in the Smokies always means Little Yellow Stoneflies.  There are different species, ranging in size from the big Golden Stones down to #18 but most commonly in the #12-#16 range.  The following is one of my favorite patterns for this hatch.  I like it for two reasons:  it is easy to tie, and it floats very well.  If you want to try it out, here is the recipe.

Hook: #16 TMC 100 or similar dry fly hook
Thread: Yellow 8/0
Body:  Yellow Poly Yarn
Wing:  Yellow Poly Yarn
Hackle: Light or Medium Dun, trimmed on the bottom


Lots of other great patterns work, but I'm about efficient, easy to tie patterns that still wear out the fish.  Next time you are heading up to the Smokies, make sure and stay until evening and then tie one of these on.  You'll be glad you did...

6 comments:

  1. Nice and simple! And a floater for sure too.

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  2. Caleb, you're right, between the poly yarn and hackle it does great staying on top!

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  3. That fly would surely work in England when the Yellow Sallies are about. In flight they look like little yellowish Chinook helicopters and on the water they sit close like your cropped hackle lets your fly sit.

    Regular Rod

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  4. Regular Rod, I think getting the fly to sit on the water correctly is important and this fly almost always lands correctly and sits close to the surface. Definitely a good pattern!

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  5. Ever tie these in other colors as a simple fly pattern? i.e. grays or browns maybe?

    ReplyDelete
  6. I may have tied these in brown but I can't remember. It would be a great caddis pattern when tied in the correct hatch-matching colors. Definitely fun to experiment with. Another option is to dub the body but I really like the poly yarn wing as it floats well and is easy to see...

    ReplyDelete

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