Guided Trips

FISHING REPORT AND SYNOPSIS: 12/16/2018

The brown and brook trout are done spawning for the year but the next generation is currently in the form of eggs in the gravel. Please avoid wading through spawning areas. If you are unsure of what that looks like, Google "brown trout redd" or simply avoid walking through sand/gravel riffles and tailouts of pools. This can be a great time of year to fish in the Park. If you want solitude and a shot at a big brown trout, this is your best bet. If you want to learn about chasing this large post spawn fish, contact me for information on a guided fly fishing trip.

The tailwaters are all flowing high and keeping us mostly limited to streamers. With the continued wet weather, we probably will be limited to high water for the foreseeable future. Water temperatures here are coming down and Center Hill Lake surface temperatures are falling rapidly as well. Shad kills should be in our future for sometime this month and of course January and February and perhaps later into the spring. This fishing is very inconsistent day to day, but when you hit it right you might have the best fishing of your life.

Musky streams are up and down with the rains. We hope to get in a few musky floats soon. As always, check back here for updates as conditions change.

Photo of the Month: Fall on the Tellico

Photo of the Month: Fall on the Tellico

Monday, April 08, 2013

Baby Bass

Boulder County is blessed, not only with some quality trout water, but with a diverse array of warm water options as well.  Last Thursday I managed an hour or so exploring a new pond.  My original goal was to look for some big bluegill, but I soon realized that there were too many small fish to be worth messing with.  Some big carp cruising inspired me to try and figure out that species as well, but in the meantime I rigged up for bass or anything else that might hit.

Then I proceeded to fish, casting again and again with only an occasional tap to remind me that I was trying to catch something.  Those taps were mostly from bluegill with appetites much larger than their small size would normally indicate.  Eventually I decided to downsize.  Apparently the bass weren't hungry, or I wasn't stealthy enough, or maybe I'm just not a bass angler yet (definitely the most likely conclusion here).  Anyway, I was now changing tactics from let's catch some bass to let's not get skunked.  Those bluegill were looking pretty interesting at this point.

Only a couple of casts with the new fly (a Simi Seal Leech of course!!!), and I hooked up.  The monster took me for a ride all over the lake..........oh, wait, that must be from another story.  I quickly landed the bass, glad to have avoided a skunk although not entirely sure if baby fish count or if that just makes me a mean fisherman



2 comments:

  1. Little ones are just as much fun as the big ones, only in a smaller way.

    ReplyDelete
  2. David
    A nice bass on the fly rod any day--that is why I love fly fishing is so much; because you are always giving the fish a fighting chance as opposed to the 7 ft. ugly stick in bass fishing with the casting rod. thanks for sharing

    ReplyDelete

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