Guided Trips

FISHING REPORT AND SYNOPSIS: 02/03/2018

The Smokies are fishing slow on most days although the potential for a big brown is always present this time of year. Most days are seeing water temperatures in the low 40s at best and usually colder. Occasional midges, BWOs, and winter stoneflies will provide some surface activity on the warmer afternoons. For the most part, however, this will be a nymphing or streamer game this time of year. If we get some higher water, hit the brown trout streams with your favorite streamers (remember single hook only in the Park) and hunt that one trophy. When you catch it, take a picture to remember the moment and let it go for the next angler to enjoy.

Tailwaters have been fishing very well as of late. Our favorite, the Caney Fork, continues to have opportunities for both wade and float trips. Windows for wading look to go down sometime in the near future, unfortunately. The forecast this week calls for some potentially heavier rain which will probably kick the generators back on for a while. The good news? That means the shad kill should be in full effect. The Clinch and Holston have also been fishing well. If you want to check any of these tailwaters out, contact me for info on guided trips.

Photo of the Month: Breaking Cabin Fever

Photo of the Month: Breaking Cabin Fever

Saturday, March 08, 2014

Hike and Fish

As I mentioned in my last post, I always am keeping my eye out for opportunities to combine hiking and fishing.  Hiking helps me focus on my surroundings a bit better.  While fishing, I tend to get so caught up on what is happening on the water that I forget to notice the scenery.  The hiking allows me to enjoy the best of both worlds.  Wandering through the woods with a camera over my shoulder and a fly rod in hand is my favorite way to get out in nature.

A favorite local destination is Cumberland Mountain State Park.  In the winter, Byrd Lake is the recipient of quite a few rainbow trout.  As we move into spring, the trout that have managed to elude the catch and fry crowd start to color up and look more healthy.  After all, trout weren't meant to live their lives in concrete lined runs.  They quickly begin eating more natural food and can usually be found rising to midges in late winter.

Even though I've walked this lake since I was a little kid, I never know what I might find so the camera must come along.  On this particular day, it was first employed in photographing some of the trout I was catching.  One of my favorite patterns for stocked trout is the bead head Simi Seal Leech.  Incredibly easy to tie, it also happens to hold up pretty well to a good chewing.  This picture gives you a good view of this pattern.


The magic that encourages me to carry a camera happened at the upper end of the lake where the creek is still flowing.  Here the waters of the creek were so smooth and calm that the forest above was perfectly reflected.



This stream can contain trout as the fish move up out of the lake.  The casting is tight though and because of heavy silting over the years, wading is not advised.


The rest of my hike was uneventful other than catching a few small bluegill.  It is great to see the warm water species starting to get active.  That is always a sure fire sign that spring is about to arrive!

6 comments:

  1. "Hiking helps me focus on my surroundings a bit better." Needless to say it's also good exercise. Looks a lot like Putah Creek. Good for roll cast practice.

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    Replies
    1. So true Mark! Roll casting definitely is one of the main casts I use when I fish here...

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  2. Nice looking area for sure, David. I agree with you that fishing should be combined with some reflection on what you see as you to and from the water. Easy to miss things for sure. BTW, agree with you on the Seal / Mohair type leeches.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks Mel! Those leeches are my go-to warm water flies if panfish are involved as well. Great little flies!

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  3. David
    That is a perfect area to fish my favorite nymph, the Seal Leech. I really like to fish this pattern in slower water. Thanks again for introducing me to this fantastic fly. I land trout on the Leech when nothing else will work.

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    Replies
    1. Bill, I'm glad that pattern has worked so well for you!

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