Guided Trips

FISHING REPORT AND SYNOPSIS: 01/01/2017

Happy New Years!!! Fishing is going to be tough for a few days. The cold snap has everything icing over except for the tailwaters. If you must fish, stay safe and be prepared for the possibility of getting wet. The streams of the Smokies are almost pointless to fish right now. That said, the forecast suggests there may be some opportunity to fish in the mountains and find a little success starting next Sunday. Temperatures above freezing are what we are looking for here. Not good odds, mind you, but certainly better than being in the deep freeze.

Tailwaters are a bit more reliable through the winter months. Streamer action should be anywhere from average to good depending on the day. On low water on rivers such as the Clinch, throw midges and you should find some fish. The Caney is still quite a ways away from seeing low water so it will be a streamer game almost exclusively.

Photo of the Month: Smoky Mountains Winter Brown Trout

Photo of the Month: Smoky Mountains Winter Brown Trout
©2017 Leah Shulley

Thursday, January 22, 2015

Greedy Smallmouth

On Tuesday, I had the good fortune of getting out to chase musky and smallmouth bass and to just enjoy the warm weather we had for a few days. Dan Munger made it over to fish since it was his day off from Little River Outfitters. As always it was great having him in the boat. I also had my buddy Tyler who had not been on the boat yet. The goal was to chase some musky. Dan did well on his first musky float a few weeks ago and got that first musky out of the way so we were hoping for a repeat performance. Unfortunately the fish had other ideas and we just didn't see very many over the course of the day but then that's musky fishing for you. Of course, Tyler is not convinced that there aren't really such thing as musky in the rivers we fish so we'll have to take him again to show him some fish. he highlight of the day was when Dan had just cast to a nice rocky ledge. He barely started his retrieve before the heavy fly rod was bent under the weight of a nice fish. I thought for sure it was a nice musky, but he quickly announced it was a smallmouth. After a solid fight, we got the fish in the net and took some pictures. First, notice the size of the fly it hit! The fly was at least 6-7 inches long and perhaps more!



The best part though was that the fish had a large crawdad stuck in its throat. Talk about a greedy fish! It had a big meal and still wanted more.



The rest of the float was uneventful except for the one musky that taunted us by rolling 10 feet off of the takeout ramp as we were approaching it. I guess we'll just have to get back out there sometime soon and try to even the score a little. As we took out the boat, the sunset alone made the whole trip worthwhile.

8 comments:

  1. David
    Just shows how aggressive a smallmouth can be; this post is firing me up for the upcoming spot explosion on top at Smith in March. I landed spots there last year in 56 degree water with the boggle bug--can't wait---glad you guys made a connection--thanks for sharing

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    1. Bill, I'll look forward to those reports from you. I always enjoy hearing about the good spotted bass fishing you enjoy. Thanks for stopping by!

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  2. Fish with an attitude right there. I can't wait for the Ozarks to get a little warmer!!! Love SMB!!!!

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    1. Drew, they are one of the hardest fighting fish out there if you ask me. I'm looking forward to warmer weather as well so I can chase them more around here on the Plateau. Thanks for reading!

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  3. Big smallmouth love a big fly!

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    Replies
    1. I'm still learning that apparently. Most of the creeks I fish require small flies but I may have to try some larger ones for a change...

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  4. Hard to imagine a big ol musky on a fly rod. How fun!

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    Replies
    1. Howard, I guess you'll just have to book a plane ticket for TN so we can put you on one!

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