Guided Trips

FISHING REPORT AND SYNOPSIS: 12/3/2019

Winter fishing is nearly upon us. Snow yesterday has given way to falling water temperatures in the Smokies. In general, fish will be hunkered down, although by tomorrow they should start to get more active again as temperatures warm. For the next three months, expect many more fish in the slower places in the Park. Think nymphs and maybe streamers but don't be surprised to find fish rising to blue-winged olives or midges on some days.

On tailwaters like the Clinch, brown trout and some fall spawn rainbows are doing their thing. This is a good time to review good ethics when it comes to spawning trout. Remember that these are the next generation of trout and the best thing you can do is to leave them alone. Avoid wading through spawning areas and don't fish for obvious spawners. For the foreseeable future, we should have high water thanks to big rains this last weekend. Fishing out of the drift boat will be very good through the winter with both nymphing and streamer fishing a distinct possibility. Want to swing for the fences and go for just one monster? Streamers will just get better and better going into January and February.

The Caney is slowly coming around. A few shad are coming through the dam, but lingering water quality problems are limiting the fishing. Winter streamer floats will produce shots at larger brown trout for anglers willing to work hard. Next spring should bring good fishing again.

Winter is our favorite time to get on the musky streams. In between bouts of high water, those will be fishing well for the next few months.

Photo of the Month: Big Fish Chuck Strikes Again

Photo of the Month: Big Fish Chuck Strikes Again

Tuesday, February 17, 2015

Call To Action: Protect Our Waterways

Just a few days ago, I shared Transboundary, a new short film highlighting the concerns with large scale open pit mining in the border region between Alaska and British Columbia. First of all, if you have not watched the film please do so before reading the rest of this by clicking the link above.

Once you have watched it and understand the challenges currently facing the pristine watersheds in southeast Alaska, please consider signing this petition. From mountaintop removal coal mines in the eastern United States to large scale open pit mines for copper, gold, silver, and other metals in the western part of the country, I have seen first hand what happens during the mining process.

The land will not be the same for a long time, much longer than our own lifetimes. Sadly the Canadian government seems comfortable making the decision to allow these mines to go forward, even with clear historical precedents showing the disaster that can occur when the mining process fails. This petition is short and to the point and encourages Secretary of State John Kerry to use all forms of diplomacy available to bring pressure on the Canadian government and companies choosing to go forward with the proposed mines in British Columbia.

At stake is not only pristine wilderness and clean waterways, but huge anadromous runs of fish that provide the basis of the local economy in southeast Alaska. Endanger those fish and the economy they support, and you endanger peoples' livelihoods. Sign the petition today to encourage Secretary Kerry to do all that he can to protect these waterways.

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