Guided Trips

UPDATE: 8/25/2016 Smokies Fly Fishing Report -- Current Hatches: Isonychias (Slate Drake), Little Yellow Stoneflies, Golden Stoneflies, Tan and Cinnamon Caddis, inch worms, beetles, and ants. Tough summer conditions prevail once again. Warm weather and low flows means two things: go up high in elevation and be ultra sneaky. Think terrestrials for the most part but don't hesitate to experiment a little. If you need to learn how to fish these streams and where to go, a guided trip with me can help you accomplish that!

Caney Fork Fly Fishing Report: This river continues to shine. This is one of the better summers I've had the privilege to enjoy on this river and things should continue to be good as we head into the fall. Boat traffic is starting to slow down a little on weekdays so this is a good time to get out. Midges are the primary producer on our float trips now. I have some availability if you are looking for a guided trip so contact me about a float or wade trip if you want to enjoy this fishing at TroutZoneAnglers@gmail.com or call/text (931) 261-1884.

Clinch River Fishing Report: Flows are mostly up so heavy deep nymphing or streamer fishing will be the way to go during periods of generation. Look for fish eating terrestrials along the banks and especially in areas of soft water.

Holston River: Give this river a break on the trout sections until next winter. Water temperatures on most of the trout water are elevated and fishing now will stress these beautiful fish.

Cumberland Plateau Fishing Report: Smallmouth bass fishing is good as of late. Both topwater bugs and subsurface offerings are getting it done. Before we know it, the cooler weather of fall will have us chasing muskie again as well!


Photo of the Month: Catch and Release

Photo of the Month: Catch and Release

Tuesday, February 23, 2016

Watching Bobbers

Bobbers. One of the more polarizing words in the sport of fly fishing. I actually saw a Craigslist ad for a drift boat one time where the guy mentioned that he wanted the boat to find a home with someone who wouldn't "bobber fish" out of it. Bobbers, strike indicators, all the same in most minds, but if you ask me they are also a useful tool.

A lot of us started our fishing journey with bobbers for that matter. I can still remember going fishing for the first time, probably around the age of 5. Staring for what seemed like an eternity at the bobber that my dad had rigged above a nice fat night crawler. The amount of patience it takes to stare at a bobber is probably a good indicator of whether someone will make it as an angler. Even at a young age I had it, or at least that is what my memory says. Probably as a result of the pleasant outings to the local state park as a kid, I still enjoy bobber fishing. In the Smokies I rarely use one although I did this past Sunday. High water made high sticking on the other side of the stream tough, but a strike indicator helped to suspend my nymphs in just the right spot to catch some trout. Drifting down the Caney in the drift boat while watching indicators is enjoyable as well. You just never know what will be on the other end of the line when that indicator goes down. I used a bobber today also, sort of.

The weather has felt like early spring now for the last week or more. Lots of birds have been heading north. The robins have arrived in large flocks, the daffodils are coming up, and in the Smokies, blue quills have started hatching. It was inevitable, then, that I eventually started thinking about fishing ponds and small lakes for panfish. It is probably a little early for good crappie fishing, but the only way to find out for sure is to go check.

On this particular water, I rarely ever feel the need to fish with anything other than a small bead head Simi Seal Leech. This little pattern catchings both the bluegill and crappie and even an occasional bass although I don't specifically target them with this fly. Today, I arrived rigged with the same four weight I had been fishing in the Smokies on Sunday afternoon, a nine foot four weight Sage Accel. Almost immediately I noticed fish spooking out of the shallows, and I had not even thrown a cast yet.

The water was still quite clear from the recent cold weather, but the fish were obviously on the prowl and hungry with pods of fish cruising just under the surface and even rising occasionally. I stripped the little leech pattern for a while trying various speeds. One or two half-hearted follows was the best I could do. I did get one unusually strong tug but assume it was just a lethargic but heavy crappie. I'll never know because the hook didn't stay in the fish's mouth. Otherwise, that was it. My magic fly wasn't working so well.

Rises occasionally could still be seen, mostly on the other side of the pond. The fish near me would congregate near the surface and then leave large ripples when I moved and they spooked. Then I noticed the bugs. A small midge hatch was in progress. Confident in what the fish were eating or at least hoping to eat, I dug out the small fly cup I had tossed some extra leeches into before shoving it in my pocket. Dry flies, beetles, a few nymphs, and one fly that might serve as a midge.

A knockoff of the Zebra Midge that I tie, similar to Higa's SOS nymph, was the only fly even remotely close in size and appearance. I figured that it would fish the best if I could suspend it under the surface. My cast tended to spook fish so I wanted to leave it in one spot for a while and give the fish a chance to move back in. Digging around in the fly cup again, I pulled out one of my Smoky Mountain Beetles. In the absence of any strike indicators, it would have to work as my bobber.

Thankfully I had tossed a couple of spools of tippet in my pocket as well. In no time I had rigged a dry/dropper rig. The beetle was my indicator and the small nymph would hopefully be close enough to a midge. Turns out that it was.

Fishing for bluegill near Crossville TN

In another 15 minutes of fishing, I finally caught three nice bluegill. Two of them hit soon after the fly hit the water, probably while the nymph was still falling. The third hit after the indicator had sat there for a while, just like I had originally intended, and I was satisfied with having solved the puzzle. Three fish seemed like enough for a quick outing just a couple of miles from home. Come to think about it, I caught exactly three fish my first time watching bobbers also.

10 comments:

  1. I used that same technique all throughout early winter. Caught tons of gills and crappie, including some on the dry... it's so cool to catch panfish on flies in the winter!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I had one fish come up and nibble the beetle yesterday. Not enough of a commitment to get hooked though. Panfish are tough to beat in any season!

      Delete
  2. We all definitely started out watching a bobber. What a ridiculous craigslist ad haha. It's a timeless technique and is still extremely useful today, and your outing shows exactly that. Very nice post, David. That's a really nice bluegill btw!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks! That pond puts out some quality bluegill every year for me.

      Delete
  3. David
    The bobber fishing was my first encounter as well, as was my children and now my grandchildren. I think I will give the indicator a try on one of the small lakes I fish here. How I love bluegill fishing; those you landed had to be fun on the 4 wt. Thanks for sharing

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Bill! It is definitely a good way to catch a bunch of fish.

      Delete
  4. Indicators brought me a couple fish on the Lower Owens. When I'm fishing for pan fish I generally pull a bobber with a red worm behind as a fish locator since I don't have an electric one on my tube. Bobbers are an integral part of all fishing.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Bluegill the gateway fish

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I've started many people on bluegill with a fly rod. The smiles usually suggest that their fishing journey has just started. Thanks for the comment!

      Delete

Newsletter

Subscribe to the Trout Zone Anglers Newsletter!

* indicates required