Guided Trips

UPDATE: 6/26/2016 Smokies Fly Fishing Report -- Current Hatches: Blue-winged Olives, Sulfurs, Light Cahills, Pale Evening Duns, Isonychias (Slate Drake), Little Yellow and Little Green Stoneflies, Golden Stoneflies, Tan and Cinnamon Caddis, inch worms, beetles, and ants. Hatches are sparse for the most part. Early and late is the best time to fish now with terrestrials becoming more important as a component of the trout's diet. We have reached that point in the summer where heading higher in elevation will increase your odds of success as will a good hike. High water days will be excellent in the lower elevations throwing nymphs or streamers. If you need to learn how to fish these streams and where to go, a guided trip with me can help you accomplish that!

Caney Fork Fly Fishing Report: Terrestrial season is upon us but we have been boating some large trout on nymphs and midges as well. Fishing will remain great if you know the river. The best way to enjoy this fishing is out of the drift boat which allows us to access some less pressured sections. Contact me about a float or wade trip if you want to enjoy this fishing at TroutZoneAnglers@gmail.com or call/text (931) 261-1884.

Clinch River Fishing Report: Watch for sulfurs and be prepared with nymph, emerger, and dun imitations if the fish are noticing them. So far the hatch has not been anything to write home about. When there aren't a lot of bugs on the water, stick with small nymph, emerger, and midge patterns and you should catch some nice trout.

Holston River: Still some very nice trout being caught. There is still a mixed bag of caddis and sulfurs along with the possibility of craneflies. When nothing else is working, try midges or scuds. With the heat, the Holston will only fish well for a little longer and then it is best to give the trout there a break.

Cumberland Plateau Fishing Report: Smallmouth fishing is anywhere from fair to good depending on the day. Most of your fishing can be on the surface now. Watch the rainfall and flow gauges to make sure the streams aren't blown out by summer thunderstorms. Otherwise it is time to fish for smallmouth bass!


Photo of the Month: Midnight Pool

Photo of the Month: Midnight Pool

Friday, March 04, 2016

Using the Extra Day


Starting a new personal challenge can be difficult, especially if you virtually quit before starting. Back in January, I announced my goal to catch a brook trout each month of the year. Then I proceeded to quit fishing for several weeks or at least something close to that.

My trip to California probably had something to do with that, but also there were extenuating circumstances. Here on the Cumberland Plateau, high water dominated through February. In the Smokies, frequent bouts of cold weather gave the trout a severe case of lock jaw. Not that I'm opposed to fishing in tough conditions, mind you, but I had gotten a little soft. Beyond that, I spent much more time hiking here close to home than I normally do. Hiking and exploring just for the joy of getting outside is a great way to stay in shape for the upcoming fishing season. Unfortunately it doesn't help me catch fish.

And so I woke up one morning and noticed the calendar barreling towards March at an alarming rate. My brook trout challenge was about to die, almost before starting. Thankfully, Fate had already intervened ahead of time by designating this as a leap year. When I saw that extra day on the calendar for February, I knew it meant I had to get out and catch a brook trout. That is how I found myself headed towards the Great Smoky Mountains National Park this past Monday. The goal was to catch brook trout on Monday and then look for spring hatches on Tuesday.

Responsibilities closer to home kept my in Crossville until 11:00 a.m. or so, but then I was heading towards the mountains. A new 2016 fishing license was in hand (yes, it is that time again). My usual quick stop by Little River Outfitters was nearly skipped because of the late hour and the fact that my brook trout challenge was facing failure. In the end, I decided to stop by to say hello to the guys working there. This quick stop helped me to relax a bit and not take the brook trout challenge too seriously, important stuff when you only have a handful of hours left to keep the streak alive. Fishing relaxed will always turn out better than fishing stressed.

Driving up the mountain, I intended to fish road side. Smokemont was the destination for the night's camping, and I knew where a few brookies were on my way there. Normally I'll head up high before starting, but on this day I didn't go quite as far as normal. Last December, on a guide trip, I had an angler miss what I was certain was a colorful brook trout from a plunge pool with a big back eddy. That fish was the one I was hoping for.

Before I knew it I had my waders on and looked at the rods I had brought with me. Which one to use? The tube containing my Orvis Superfine Glass rod (7'6" 4 weight) jumped out at me so I put it together and attached a Hydros reel loaded with 4 weight line. To this I added a black Elk Hair Caddis on the end of a 5x leader in size #16 and dropped a small bead head nymph off the bend of the dry fly hook using 6x tippet. With my fishing pack in tow along with a camera, I finally had everything together and headed to my spot. The sun was still on the water. This time of year that is generally a good thing.


I warmed up by fishing a couple of pools below the place I had pinned my hopes on. By the time I slid into position just across from the back eddy, my casts were going approximately where they should, and I felt as confident as one could when fishing against the clock. Two drifts around the back eddy resulted in absolutely nothing, but then the fish helped me by betraying its presence. Rising to some minuscule hatch just behind the large boulder that created the safe haven, it didn't eat fast enough to avoid detection. A glimpse of bright orange fins told me this was indeed the fish I was looking for. My next cast was perfect, about 10 inches above the fish. It turned and followed. I saw its mouth open and close and knew it had taken the dropper. All that was left was to not screw up and lose this pretty brook trout. Mission accomplished.


After enjoying the elation of keeping my streak intact, I went looking for a few more trout before heading over the ridge to camp. Over the next hour, I was surprised by another six or seven trout, about 50/50 rainbow to brook trout. My surprise was not because of the beautiful and unseasonably warm day, but because the water was frigid like snow melt. Turns out it was snow melt, but the fish were still ready to eat after a cold winter. Some of them even ate dry flies!





Most of the fish involved some form of spotting before catching and most were spotted because I saw them rise first. Spring is definitely coming, but as the afternoon wore on it was hard to remember that. The temperature started dropping as cold air came down from the snowpack just above, and I decided to head on to camp with enough daylight to fish some in the lower elevations.

Using the extra day helped keep my short brook trout streak alive. Going into the warm months should help extend the streak now. I have two of the toughest months out of the way and improving conditions ahead.


6 comments:

  1. Beautiful David. Glad that your streak is still going. The weather has been beautiful in Colorado so maybe this weekend will be a good place to start my own streak.

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    Replies
    1. Howard, I hope you have been getting out lately! This time of year can be maddening but those nice days are worth the wait.

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  2. David
    What a great story, makes one thing they are right there with you. Those mountain trout are so colorful. I notice you said you were using your 4 weight, 7 ½ ft. do you ever use a 3 weight and shorter fly rod GSMP? I would think that the 7 ½ ft. would be the excellent for those streams there. Great Post—thanks for sharing

    I am thinking of purchasing a 7 ½ ft. 4 weight I found in Cabela’s yesterday in Huntsville—that store is awesome, the largest Cabela’s I’ve been in. If I get it I will bring it on our trip to the Caney.

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    Replies
    1. Bill, I occasionally use a 7' 5" 3 weight in the Smokies, but prefer longer rods. I'm thinking about adding a 9' 2 or 3 weight (or maybe a couple) this year for guiding. Makes the little fish more fun!

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  3. What a perfect use of the extra day! So excited to have trout taking dries.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks Ben! Every winter I wait for these moments. Glad it is finally here.

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