Guided Trips


Things have changed a lot since the last report. Unseasonably warm weather has kicked off the first hatches of the year in the Great Smoky Mountains while an extremely wet February means all of the tailwaters are blown out across middle and east Tennessee.

If you want to fish in the Smokies, nymphs and streamers will be your best bet unless you encounter a hatch. In that case, Blue Quills and Quill Gordons should be in your arsenal as well as Blue-winged Olives.

For now, just forget about the tailwaters in the short term. continued rain means it will be at least another month before the tailwaters are fishable again. With luck, we can start thinking about some streamer float trips on the Caney Fork in mid to late March, although that may be optimistic. In the meantime, head for the mountains and enjoy chasing the wild trout there.

Photo of the Month: Breaking Cabin Fever

Photo of the Month: Breaking Cabin Fever

About David Knapp

David Knapp grew up fishing middle and eastern Tennessee, especially the waters of the Great Smoky Mountains.  By the late '90s, he was delving into the tailwater game, learning the ins and outs of fishing midges and other bugs that are especially prevalent on rivers like the Caney Fork.  Starting in 2004, David has spent a considerable amount of time around the western United States, fishing in Arizona, Colorado, Wyoming, and Montana.  In 2012, he moved to Colorado for a year and a half which allowed him to continue to gain additional skills and learn techniques from seasoned Rocky Mountain anglers.  Now, David has moved back to his home state of Tennessee and is guiding in the Great Smoky Mountains as well as on area tailwaters.  A relatively unknown destination that anglers will enjoy is the Cumberland Plateau warm water streams that offer pristine smallmouth and panfish opportunities and even the occasional musky.

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