Guided Trips

FISHING REPORT AND SYNOPSIS: 09/14/2018

Heavy rains are returning to the mountains of east Tennessee with the remnants of Hurricane Florence. Hopefully we get just enough and not too much water!

Wet years normally produce some fantastic fishing in the Smokies and this year has been no different. No matter where we fish, it seems that the fishing is amazing this year. We have seen some nice brown trout, big rainbows, and lots of good sized brook trout.

Fall fishing is looking awesome this year. The Smokies in particular will shine. Currently we are still seeing good numbers of Golden Stoneflies and Isonychias. Soon we should start seeing more of the fall Blue-winged Olives and fall caddis. Terrestrials are still going strong as well so remember your box of ants, inchworms, beetles, and other goodies.

The Caney Fork has picked up slightly from some very slow fishing earlier this summer. As we go into fall, the fishing will be decent although not great. I recommend getting on the guide calendar for a trip next spring in May as that month should be killer. Of course, the winter shad kill will be awesome as well.

Photo of the Month: Fishing in Paradise

Photo of the Month: Fishing in Paradise

Tuesday, June 10, 2008

Candy Ants

Officially summer has yet to begin. Apparently someone missed the memo however, because it has been excessively hot here in East Tennessee. July and August are usually our warmest months and when the heat is combined with lower rainfall, the streams start to warm up a little more than is generally healthy for trout. This year the weather seems to be backward with the temperature in the Little River at the Wye above Townsend spiking up into the 70’s during the afternoon. The streams are starting to get a bit low as well but the forecast shows hope for that and for cooler (at least relatively) temperatures to go along with the much-needed rain.

With the streams warming up and getting low, it is time to start thinking about terrestrials. One thing I’ve noticed during recent fishing trips is the number of ants on the water. Apparently the fish have also been taking notice. Yesterday evening I hit the stream for about an hour and a half. I decided to stick to terrestrials with one of those being an ant pattern. For my other fly I tied on the famed Green Weenie (dropped the ant of that) and added a bit of split shot.

Ants must taste like candy to trout. Approximately ¾ of the trout I caught ate the ant pattern, and most of them hit with gusto. Not only did I catch plenty of fish but also caught some nice ones including one a bit over 8 inches (pictured) and another that was in the 10 inch range that took off while I was messing with my camera. With the water being low, it is extremely important to be stealthy while fishing right now. If you sneak directly up behind the fish you can often spot them out feeding in the prime lie in each hole. The hatches seem to be starting to slow down some, but there is still a good variety of insects on the water including the little yellow stoneflies and a few random mayflies and caddis. Still, the top item in the buffet appears to be ants in all shapes and sizes, but the majority I’ve seen around the water look to be averaging about a #16.


If we get the rain that’s forecast, the fishing should pick up and be good for a day or two at least. Some of my better days in the park are during the summer just after a good rainstorm. The streams will rise a few inches and become a bit stained. At that time the fish will be a bit less skittish and easier to catch. Remember that the rain will be washing a lot of terrestrials into the water so be sure and have plenty of inchworm imitations to go along with some ants and beetles.

Today I have to finish (hopefully) processing the Wapsi order and get all the products out on the shelves. Yesterday I began to get a taste of the misery from the large order so today I should be in the bowels of Wapsi Hell. I think that calls for another evening fishing trip…

2 comments:

  1. Nice blog David! I've enjoyed reading about your adventures!

    DarrinG

    ReplyDelete
  2. DarrinG, thanks for reading my blog and glad you enjoy it...

    ReplyDelete

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