Guided Trips

FISHING REPORT AND SYNOPSIS: 11/7/2019

Fall fishing is in full swing. The Clinch River has been fishing great if you want to hit a tailwater. The Smokies are fishing well most days but that could change soon. Forecast low temperatures by the middle of next week are in the mid teens!

The Smokies are up and down based on rain and cold fronts. When its on this can be some of the best fishing of the year. Fish will feed heavily as we approach the lean cold months of winter. Orange Elk Hair Caddis are catching fish as well as Pheasant Tail nymphs, Prince Nymphs, and some other things like caddis pupa patterns. Don't forget to have your Blue-winged Olive patterns this time of year.

On tailwaters like the Clinch, brown trout and some fall spawn rainbows are doing their thing. This is a good time to review good ethics when it comes to spawning trout. Remember that these are the next generation of trout and the best thing you can do is to leave them alone. Avoid wading through spawning areas and don't fish for obvious spawners.

The Caney is still not fishing well. This should change soon as we generally start to see some opportunity for streamer fishing in December and continuing through the winter. Next spring should bring good fishing again.

Photo of the Month: Fiery Flanks and Fins

Photo of the Month: Fiery Flanks and Fins

Saturday, May 30, 2009

Small Stream Water


Our recent poll was about your favorite water type on small streams. Most people consider streams as having runs, riffles, and pools, but when I think small streams I think pocket water and plunge pools. In a small stream, most pools are almost pocket water themselves so you could say that it is the predominant water type. The vast majority of you interestingly prefer fishing pocket water over those larger pools. This is my favorite water type as well although the best fish will often come from the pools. Moving fast up a small stream picking the pockets is great fun with a light fly rod and a few dries.

As we move into the summer months, this will be the most efficient way to fish in the Smokies. If you are lazy, tie on a pair of nymphs instead. The only problem with fishing dries is that when the fishing is really good the fish will destroy the floatability of the dry fly long before they will chew a nymph to shreds. A well tied nymph will generally hold together much longer.

Still, if you are willing to tie on a new fly every 10-15 fish, stick to a dry fly and have a great time on the water. I'm hoping to try a small stream or two while I am in Colorado. They really are a blast to fish and while the big draw out west is all the big fish, sometimes its nice to go back to where I started this sport...on the small streams with plenty of pocket water!

1 comment:

  1. Once again you have the most outstanding photos thanks for sharing them:)

    ReplyDelete

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