Guided Trips

FISHING REPORT AND SYNOPSIS: 02/25/2018

Things have changed a lot since the last report. Unseasonably warm weather has kicked off the first hatches of the year in the Great Smoky Mountains while an extremely wet February means all of the tailwaters are blown out across middle and east Tennessee.

If you want to fish in the Smokies, nymphs and streamers will be your best bet unless you encounter a hatch. In that case, Blue Quills and Quill Gordons should be in your arsenal as well as Blue-winged Olives.

For now, just forget about the tailwaters in the short term. continued rain means it will be at least another month before the tailwaters are fishable again. With luck, we can start thinking about some streamer float trips on the Caney Fork in mid to late March, although that may be optimistic. In the meantime, head for the mountains and enjoy chasing the wild trout there.

Photo of the Month: Breaking Cabin Fever

Photo of the Month: Breaking Cabin Fever

Saturday, May 30, 2009

Small Stream Water


Our recent poll was about your favorite water type on small streams. Most people consider streams as having runs, riffles, and pools, but when I think small streams I think pocket water and plunge pools. In a small stream, most pools are almost pocket water themselves so you could say that it is the predominant water type. The vast majority of you interestingly prefer fishing pocket water over those larger pools. This is my favorite water type as well although the best fish will often come from the pools. Moving fast up a small stream picking the pockets is great fun with a light fly rod and a few dries.

As we move into the summer months, this will be the most efficient way to fish in the Smokies. If you are lazy, tie on a pair of nymphs instead. The only problem with fishing dries is that when the fishing is really good the fish will destroy the floatability of the dry fly long before they will chew a nymph to shreds. A well tied nymph will generally hold together much longer.

Still, if you are willing to tie on a new fly every 10-15 fish, stick to a dry fly and have a great time on the water. I'm hoping to try a small stream or two while I am in Colorado. They really are a blast to fish and while the big draw out west is all the big fish, sometimes its nice to go back to where I started this sport...on the small streams with plenty of pocket water!

1 comment:

  1. Once again you have the most outstanding photos thanks for sharing them:)

    ReplyDelete

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