Guided Trips

FISHING REPORT AND SYNOPSIS: 12/3/2019

Winter fishing is nearly upon us. Snow yesterday has given way to falling water temperatures in the Smokies. In general, fish will be hunkered down, although by tomorrow they should start to get more active again as temperatures warm. For the next three months, expect many more fish in the slower places in the Park. Think nymphs and maybe streamers but don't be surprised to find fish rising to blue-winged olives or midges on some days.

On tailwaters like the Clinch, brown trout and some fall spawn rainbows are doing their thing. This is a good time to review good ethics when it comes to spawning trout. Remember that these are the next generation of trout and the best thing you can do is to leave them alone. Avoid wading through spawning areas and don't fish for obvious spawners. For the foreseeable future, we should have high water thanks to big rains this last weekend. Fishing out of the drift boat will be very good through the winter with both nymphing and streamer fishing a distinct possibility. Want to swing for the fences and go for just one monster? Streamers will just get better and better going into January and February.

The Caney is slowly coming around. A few shad are coming through the dam, but lingering water quality problems are limiting the fishing. Winter streamer floats will produce shots at larger brown trout for anglers willing to work hard. Next spring should bring good fishing again.

Winter is our favorite time to get on the musky streams. In between bouts of high water, those will be fishing well for the next few months.

Photo of the Month: Big Fish Chuck Strikes Again

Photo of the Month: Big Fish Chuck Strikes Again

Monday, April 09, 2012

The Professional

Having a professional photographer around can be a nerve wracking experience.  Anyone who has ever been in a professional studio knows what I'm talking about.  Sit like this, turn your head slightly to the left, drop your chin, place your hands here....you get the idea.  Fortunately, that demanding attitude that is so necessary to getting a good shot does not always carry over into real life outside of the profession.  On our trip to the Everglades, we had a genuine photography/filmmaker professional along for the ride, and it was definitely a treat.  Tanya Not only did she shoot a lot of video of the trip to put together a short movie of the experience, but she also shared her knowledge and we all became better photographers because of it. 

Tanya behind the lens of her camera... 

Having four DSLRs on a trip is a great way to get multiple perspectives.  Each person focuses on a different aspect so the sum of their perspectives can give a much more well-rounded view of the trip.  The following are a collection of pictures that Tanya graciously sent me to use.  My first request was obviously for some fishing-related pictures, but I also mentioned that any other really cool shots would be nice. 

If you are interested in seeing more of her work, or in need of a professional photographer for shooting weddings or anything else, check out Tanya's blog.  All of the following photographs are by Tanya Musgrave.




















2 comments:

  1. Nice shots, I wish I had a friend who was a pro photographer. It's hard to find people who want to take pictures while you're fishing. Most people you fish with want to just fish. So you get a lot of pictures of your hand or fish in general.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Kevin,

    It was awesome to not always be the one behind the lens. I love taking pictures but it usually means that I'm not in most trip photos.

    David Knapp

    ReplyDelete

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