Guided Trips

FISHING REPORT AND SYNOPSIS: 07/01/2018

Heavy rains recently means the Caney Fork River is back up. Streamer fishing will be decent to good, but this is not for everyone. Fishing in the Smokies continues to be excellent.

Wet years normally produce some fantastic fishing in the Smokies and this year is no different. No matter where we fish, it seems that the fishing is amazing this year. We have seen some nice brown trout, big rainbows, and lots of good sized brook trout this year.

Now we are getting into standard summer terrestrial fishing. Ants, inch worms, beetles, and even occasionally hoppers are all getting it done.

On the Caney Fork, flows should start coming down within a week or two. Once we start seeing low water again, the usual nymphs and midges should produce along with some terrestrials and even streamers.

Photo of the Month: Big Fish Gary at it Again

Photo of the Month: Big Fish Gary at it Again

Friday, July 04, 2008

Don’t Take My Picture!!!

When I go fishing, I almost always carry a camera. One never knows when the perfect photo op will present itself, and of course there is always the possibility of catching a truly memorable fish. If there’s one thing I’ve learned about photographing fish however, it is that you can never expect a fish to just roll over and pose.

This presents a problem for the conscientious angler: how do you achieve the balance between getting the perfect shot and yet not compromising the life of the fish in the process?

There have been times where I’ve caught a nice fish but because of a variety of factors decided the shot was just not worth it. Perhaps the fish was acting severely stressed or the water temperature was quite high. Sometimes I feel like I didn’t play the fish fast enough and it just needs to be returned to its natural state as soon as possible. Often though I manage to come up with a decent picture.

There are a few things I try to keep in mind with respect to the health of the fish. First I always wet my hands before touching the fish. Too many times I’ve seen first hand the ugly result of improper handling. The fish will soon have nasty white spots where the mucous membrane has been damaged or removed if you are not careful. Second, I try to keep my fish in the water as much as possible. Many of my shots are taken with the fish laying on its side near shore, and these shots are always done either with the fish still lying in shallow water or on a wet bed of moss or grass. Fish should never be placed on dry dirt, rocks, or anything else streamside. Finally, I try to keep fish off of rocks that are not either in the water or more than a couple of inches from the water. If the fish starts flopping it can hurt itself if it doesn’t reach water immediately. Once again, the great shot is just not worth killing the fish.

Of course, sometimes in the excitement of the moment you still place fish in a less than ideal position for the photograph. I’ve done it plenty of times myself but by trying to remember the fish, you can usually get a good shot and keep the fish in shape for the next contest.

Fish are not always cooperative for pictures. Often they remind me of a young kid that is camera shy. I’ve got some hilarious pictures over the years when a picture was taken just as the fish bolted for freedom. This summer I’ve already had some pretty good ones. Maybe these are the best pictures of all. I’m left with a funny memory, because after all, it is supposed to be all about having fun…

A fish makes a bolt for freedom...


The fish leaps just as the picture is taken...

4 comments:

  1. Do you leave your optio on a certain setting all the time or switch it up? I have a w20 and it seems to take alot of blurry pictures, especially the shots i want!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Craig, I mostly just use the auto setting. The one thing I will change depending on what I'm trying to do is whether the flash is off or on auto. Mine takes plenty of blurry pictures as well so I generally take a few pictures of something I want to be sure and get...

    ReplyDelete
  3. Ha - those are some of the best photos...they certainly tell a story!

    ReplyDelete

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